Robber Fly

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Robber Fly

Flying Insect Predator

The Robber Fly is here in Tennessee, you just have a hard time spotting them. If you do happen to see one, it would probably be hiding in a heavily covered area of plants or in the soil. They only come out during the hottest hours of a sunny day to hunt. And when they are out they are mostly in flight or hiding in a strike pose ready to capture their prey. The Robber Fly is a true predator and only feeds on other insects and their larvae. And as stated, they spend a lot of time flying, so they catch most of their prey in the air. They are so adept at air attacks and voracious predators that they even attack and kill large Bumble Bees.

Robber Flies are fairly large themselves, being up to 1 ¾” Long and ½” in diameter. They are distinctive looking with large bristles on their head that make it look as if they have a moustache. These flies are long and skinny and range from a dark gray or black in color and look very hairy with bristles covering most of their bodies. They have two large compound eyes with a large indentation between them. The Robber Fly is quite intimidating looking, so they match their aggressive predatory behavior.

The Robber Fly quickly soars through fields looking to swoop in like a hawk on any flying insect. They are not very particular in diet as they will kill and eat Bumble Bees, Moths, Ants, Wasps, Crickets, Butterflies, Dragonflies and Honey Bees. They will literally eat any insect that flies. Some will hide out near a hive and just wait to pick off single bees as they are coming and going from their home. They will attack, hold its prey with their legs and bite them thus injecting their venom. This venom kills the prey and also helps turn it into a more liquid state for the Robber Fly to suck up and eat the insect leaving a hollow shell. Although they are natural born killers, they also have their fair share of predators including birds, praying mantis, spiders and assassin bugs. Another reason that we rarely see them, is that they all have their territory, so you will usually only see one if you get that rare chance. If an adult Robber Fly invades the territory another Robber Fly, they are likely to become a cannibalistic meal.

Robber Flies are not like normal flies with very short life spans; rather they can live up to 3 months. During these 3 months, they eat and mate. The female will lay her eggs on vegetation or in the soil, have five stages of development and the eggs overwinter to continue the long growth process. The eggs while in the larvae stage move around to feed on eggs of other insects much like they do as adults, sucking the insides out. The process from egg to adult can take from one to three years.

We are relatively safe from this ruthless killer, as Robber Flies do not have stingers. They can bite if threatened which will be quite painful, but is not harmful in general. Either way do not attempt to handle a Robber Fly unless you want to risk a bite. The Robber Fly is not a Nashville Pest Control issue; rather they can help control the populations of other flying insects including the common house fly around your home. However if you are experiencing an uninvited pest at your home make sure to call Certified Pest Control Nashville. We can provide year round pest control and deliver local family service without pesky commissioned sales people. We at Certified Pest Control are just family, and would love to become part of your family.

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Hoverfly

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Hoverfly

A Gardner’s Friend

The Hoverfly is usually mistaken for a sweat bee or small honey bee, due to its size and colors. However, this harmless fly actually helps us by controlling the population of a well known Tennessee Pest; the aphid. Aphids can be annoying to gardeners, as they feed on the honeydew of plants. This sucks the life right out of vegetables, and you can see the damage from eaten leaves to completely dead plants. Aphids also cause other issues with the honeydew that they cannot digest, so they leave behind a residue. This residue will cover leaves causing death of plants, can cause mold growth and also attract other pests such as ants. So you see why we should love the Hoverfly. Many gardeners will actually plant white and yellow flowers or herbs among their fruit and vegetables to attract them. The Hoverfly will then assist by being a very efficient natural pest control with the use of their larvae.

Hoverflies can be identified by their black and yellow stripes (like a bee), small size of only up to ½” long and having only two wings. To further mimic a stinging insect, their wings have two darker stripes on the leading edge to make it look like they have four wings. When it rest, most predators will recognize this as a bee and stay away. But this is a fly, so it has no stinger. You can spot them hovering over flowers in order to gather nectar and are very important to the pollination process.

The Hoverfly female also helps further with the aphid control process, by locating and laying eggs near an area that has aphids. Once the eggs hatch in just a few days, they have an instant food source. Even as a larvae they can eat up to fifty aphids each, per day. That is a considerable amount for larvae with no legs, but they can still move fast. Adults do not eat the aphids, so it is the larvae that are the natural pest control at work. Larvae can consume four to five hundred aphids in their larval stage.  Then they spin a cocoon to grow into adults in just two weeks. An adult Hoverfly only lives two to four weeks and they do not overwinter, but rather die. This leaves the next generation in the ground waiting to hatch and continue life cycle next spring.

The Hoverfly is one of the true helpers of the insect world. They are relatively harmless, help with pollination only second to that of bees, and help control the aphid population of up to eighty or ninety percent of an infestation. Some Hoverfly populations have even been known to completely wipe out an aphid infestation harming a crop or garden. So, make sure to plant those white and yellow flowers, not to mention herbs such as oregano, cilantro, thyme and lemon balm so you can attract these beneficial flies.

Hoverflies are an insect you want around your house and garden, however if you are dealing with a Nashville Pest Control Issue of unwanted invaders, please give us a call. Certified Pest Control Nashville should be your first and only call to give you local family and owned personal service. Contact our family, to protect yours.

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Carolina Locust

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Carolina Locust

Dirt Colored Grasshopper

Locusts are often associated with plagues and total crop devastation; however the Carolina Locust is a different species and primarily feeds on weeds. They are one of the largest grasshoppers in the United States and can be as large as 2 ½” long with a wingspan of up to 4” wide. They live in most of our country and do inhabit Tennessee.

Many insects that we discuss are vivid with beautiful colors that make them stand out, however this is not the case with the Carolina Locust. Because they choose to live in areas of woods and live on the ground that is bare dirt, they use camouflage to blend in with their surroundings. Therefore this large grasshopper is bland tan or dirt colored in appearance. They do have a flash of color that can be seen, only when in flight; with a yellow border around their hind wings. Other than that small yellow stripe, they are just a plain dirt colored grasshopper. So, this plain color might not be pretty to look at, but it helps them to survive by blending in with their dirt habitat. Their other line of defense is by taking flight and quickly darting to a new hiding place from predators. Other grasshoppers are not so effective at flight, but with a large wingspan, the Carolina Locust can fly, hover and maneuver quite well while airborne. In a flight episode, they are able to fly as far as twenty to thirty feet. Even with their very good flying ability, they mostly inhabit the ground. After sheltering for the night; a Carolina Locust will come out into the sunshine to warm up for a few hours. They like warmer temperatures, so you will only see them during peak sunlight hours. Once warm they will go about their daily activity of walking and flying around their immediate area eating and searching for a mate. They are not a crop pest, although they have been known to damage certain corn, beans, potatoes and tobacco fields by eating the leaves.

The male will fly around and click his wings in order to attract a female. He will also find a nice patch of bare dirt to just sit and rub his hind legs together to attract the females. Once the Carolina Locust has found a mate, the female will lay up to 150 eggs in the dirt in summer. Typically these eggs will overwinter and hatch the next spring. As they hatch, the look like small locusts and molt several times in order to grow to adult size. By midsummer there is a whole other generation to begin their breeding again.

Even though the Carolina Locust is not a Tennessee Pest Control issue, they can be capable of causing considerable damage to grass and leaves around your property. You shouldn’t be too concerned about it, if you happen to see this bland colored grasshopper. However if you have other destructive, biting or stinging pests, please call Certified Pest Control Nashville. Our locally owned and operated company is happy to have one of our family visit your home to diagnose a treatment plan for your pest issue. Year round protection and preventative pest control is the best way to make sure that you stay pest free all year. Call Certified Pest Control today for a free estimate.

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False Potato Beetle

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False Potato Beetle

Close Relative of a Crop Destroyer

The False Potato Beetle is a resident here in Tennessee and very closely resembles the Colorado Potato Beetle. The biggest difference is that the Colorado Potato Beetle is very aggressive pest, voraciously feeding on potatoes that can actually destroy 100% of a crop depending on the infestation. There is also a slight variation in appearance, with the False Potato Beetle having a different color stripe on its wings and more spots on the head. They range in size from ¼” to ½” in length is a shade of orange with alternating stripes of black and white with yellow stripes in between.

False Potato Beetles do still feed on potatoes; however here in Tennessee their diet is has more variety. They have been known to also feed on ground cherries, horse nettle, husk tomatoes and bittersweet (a creeping vine that has clusters of yellow flowers and small bittersweet berries).  Although they do breed prolifically, they are not considered a Tennessee Pest Control Issue like they are out West.

After the overwinter process, the adult emerges from the ground and begin to feed on surrounding leaves. During this process they are also seeking out potential mates. Once they mate the female can lay abundance of eggs; up to 500 eggs in four weeks. These eggs are placed on the underneath of leaves where they undergo the growth process of four stages to reach adulthood. All of this happens in a short timeframe of 2 to 3 weeks. So, you see the reason that populations can grow do rapidly, as each egg can grow to be an egg producing adult within twenty to thirty days. They cause damage from hatching all the way to adult, by feeding on the surrounding leaves.

They don’t really have a natural defense, other than play dead. If you happen upon one and disturb it, the beetle will fall over on its side and lay completely still as to look dead. This is not a very effective defense, so they are easy prey, although not many predators. Ground beetles, spiders and wasps are the primary predators that feed on the Potato Beetle and its eggs. One species of Ground Beetle can eat 20 – 30 eggs per day, making it a good control predator of the Potato Beetle.

As we do not have large Potato crops in Tennessee, our False Potato Beetle is not a huge pest control concern, other than some tomato plant damage. In some of the Western United States, with the Colorado Potato Beetle, it is a major concern and most of the issue is handled through crop rotation. This serves as damage control by moving the crops in a way that will move the food source of a potato beetle infestation and thus cause the beetles to relocate to a new area to find the potatoes. They don’t relocate well, because the adults have to walk to the new food source which kills approximately ninety percent of the population of an infestation. So, by rotating the crops and relocating the new potato field up to 1/2 mile will get rid of most these slow walking crop destroyers. Also, the overwintering adults that typically emerge to start the breeding season will not have the initial food source that they need to survive, thus reducing the first generation of the year to a very low amount.

Other than the occasional damage to tomatoes or flowering plants such as bittersweet and night shade, the False Potato Beetle does not typically fall into a pest control issue here in Tennessee. However if you are having issues with our typical Tennessee summer pests such as ants, spiders, wasps, mosquitoes, fleas or even bed bugs – make sure to give Certified Pest Control Nashville a call for a free estimate. We are all family here, and offer the personal, detailed service you deserve.

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European Hornet

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European Hornet

European Hornet in Tennessee

The European Hornet are some of the largest hornets we have here in Tennessee. They can reach a total length of 1 ½” long, are brown and have black and yellow stripes on their bodies. As they are quite alarming due to their huge size, you should avoid them as they can deliver a very powerful sting. They are native to Europe, thus the name. However sometime in the 1800’s they were introduced to the United States as this country was being settled and had new visitors bringing them here.

The European Hornet is considered a Nashville, Tennessee Pest Control issue if they choose to enter or make your home, their home. Primarily the European Hornet choose to live in wooded areas, making nests from tree trunks or hollow trees. However in our overbuilt cities, so many insects look for openings to homes which can provide them the same safe harbor to live, breed and raise young. The nest is usually a paper nest that the Hornet workers build by chewing up natural material found in the area, then gluing it all together with their saliva. This construction is not only a uniform comb type design, but also the material it is made from protects it from water and wind by being so well built. The hard work of the worker European Hornets is to protect the hive, and most importantly the queen. Most nests will contain up to 500 workers and will attack aggressively if they are threatened.

The whole life process begins in Spring, when the Queen emerges and looks for a good place to build a nest. She begins by chewing up material and gluing it together, just like the workers, however at this time she is alone and building her own nest to begin laying eggs. Once these first eggs hatch, they will begin the first group of sterile workers that have one sole purpose – to continue building the nest, raising the next generation and protecting the queen. In late Summer, female Hornets with the ability to reproduce will be born in order to be fertilized. Male Hornets will also be hatched at this time to continue the reproductive process of producing new queens that overwinter and emerge the next Spring to begin this whole life cycle over again, in a new nest.

European Hornets have a variety of diet; however they tend to be predators hunting Flies, Bees, Wasps, Yellow Jackets and Grasshoppers. They also have a sweet tooth, looking for and feeding of fruit producing trees. But most of the time you will find them peacefully living around their colony and nest. They are often feared because of their size, and they can deliver quite the sting, but generally it is compared to a powerful Bee sting. That being the case, there has been cases of stings sending people to the hospital with headaches and heart conditions, so respect the nest and stay far way to avoid any adverse affects from a European Hornet sting.

If you notice any Wasps, Bees or Hornets entering and exiting your home, there is no doubt a nest. So, make sure to call a professional to deal with these stinging pests. We at Certified Pest Control Nashville are happy to assist you with a free pest prevention plan. Our Local family business is here to give you the honest and effective service you deserve.

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Flower Longhorn Beetle

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Flower Longhorn Beetle

Beetle that looks like a wasp

Most beetles are considered to be round or oval, with a hard shell like the lady beetle or ground beetle. However the Flower Longhorn Beetle is a beautiful species of Cerambycidae with a long and slender body, very long antennae and bright colors to mimic more dangerous flying pests in the garden.

The most striking feature of the Flower Longhorn Beetle is their long antennae, which can be as long as the entire body. These long antennae are the reason that they gained the name Longhorn Beetle. Their bodies  can reach up to 3/4” in length, with the antennae making an entire length of up to 1 ½”. They can develop in different color patterns, depending on the species, but here in Tennessee we will primarily see the black and yellow combination. With wings, a slender body and bright black and yellow markings they can be mistaken for a wasp or yellow jacket. That is part of their defense; to mimic or pretend to be a stinging wasp in order to scare off predators. Couple the masquerade of a dangerous stinger with a hard shell of a beetle, and they are well protected. And they need this, as they are hunted by predators such as birds, wasps or ground reptiles.

The Flower Longhorn Beetle can be spotted in peak months of summer. During June and July they prefer to fly around and survey open fields next to wooded areas in search of pollen from flowers such as the Rose and Aster family. During these months they mate, and the female lays eggs underneath the bark of trees. They do this, because the eggs hatch into larvae that need decaying wood to feed on. Some species actually feed on live trees and can cause damage to fruit bearing trees. The larvae bore into the wood and use this nutrition to develop over the next two to three months into an adult, however some species have the ability to stay dormant for up to two or three years before they develop into adults. Although some larvae damage live fruit trees, the larvae that feed on decaying wood, or old tree stumps actually contribute to the environment by allowing holes to be bored and quicken the decomposing process and making room for new plants to grow and replace the dead ones. They will actually inhabit the same stumps or decaying trees for years, never leaving and allowing generations to lay eggs, bore and continue their life cycles right there in the same tree.

The Flower Longhorn Beetle is most numerous in the tropics; however we do have the black and yellow variety right here in Nashville, Tennessee. They are not considered to be a Nashville Pest Control issue, but we definitely have our share of pests to be concerned about. Certified Pest Control Nashville is your local family owned and operated 5 – Star rated first choice to call. Contact our family to receive a free quote on year round pest prevention. Our rates and level of service cannot be beat, so give us a call at Certified Pest Control, LLC.

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Fishing Spider

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Fishing Spider

Spider that can walk on water and catch fish

When you think of Spiders, rarely do you ever think of them as running on water or catching fish as prey. That does not sound like anything that could exist in the insect world. However the Fishing Spider or “Dolomedes” does actually hunt for fish as a food source.  This larger spider species can reach over 1” in length and are brow or gray in color to blend in with the forest floors around water sources and are resident spiders here in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Fishing Spider does feed on other insects, just like related spiders. They will strategically place themselves at the edge of a source of water with one set of legs anchoring their body to the shore and the front legs extended out and floating on top of the water. The Fishing Spider is similar to an orb weaver, that senses vibrations on their “trap” web with their sensitive legs then goes in for the kill; except this spider senses the vibrations in the water. Their whole bodies are covered in very small and very sensitive hairs that can give them feedback from the water. When an insect or fish is nearby, these hairs designed with a high degree of feedback can tell the spider where their prey is and even give it an idea of what direction the water vibration is coming from. So, if the prey does not come to them as they are anchored to the shore, they can go in pursuit. This is because the hairs are also water repellent giving the Fishing Spider the ability to walk, run or swim on top of the water. They quickly get to the prey, such as a May Fly and attack. Being slick and buoyant, they can even raise up their front legs to catch the wind and sail across the water. However the Fishing Spider has another trick up its sleeve with the ability to actually go under water to catch prey. With the wax or oil like covering on the hairs on their bodies, they can actually form air bubbles that allow them to go under water and hunt for short amounts of time. This makes them very adept hunters, on top of and under the water, with tiny claws on the ends of their front legs to locate, secure the prey and then inject venom. This has led them to be observed actually hunting and eating very small fish. As crazy as this may seem, this spider hunts and eats fish due to their highly advanced body structure and special hairs they possess. These hairs are so sensitive, they can even keep the spider from gathering information that would prove to be a false positive, such as a leaf hitting the water or excessive currents in the water. They are specifically designed to sense the vibrations of a struggling insect on top of the water, or fish / tadpoles just below the surface of the water.

The Fishing Spider mates and then the eggs actually carried by the female until they hatch. With other spider species, the male actually is killed by the female after mating, however with the Fishing Spider the male actually dies without any attack from the female, as if he is giving his life to the female to eat. The female then guards the young of up to 1,000 as they grow in a protected small web sac.

These seemingly aggressive hunters are no threat to humans, as they rarely bite and even if they do it is like a minor bee sting. If you see one near your home, it may seem alarming as they resemble a very large Wolf Spider, but they are not normally considered a Nashville Pest Control Issue. However if you notice other pests such as Brown Recluse or Black Widows lurking, be quick to call Certified Pest Control Nashville, Tennessee to help diagnose and define your pest prevention program. Our Family owned and operated business will offer the best service and rates in Nashville. Just give us a try, you will not be disappointed.

 

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Blue Mud Dauber

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Blue Mud Dauber

Wasp that Hunts Spiders

Most people do not like to see wasps around their house due to the nasty sting they can deliver. However the Blue Mud Dauber that we have here in Nashville, Tennessee could be a welcome site. They help control the spider population around your home.

This impressive looking wasp is a beautiful blue metallic in appearance, are about ½” long with a narrow waist and wings that match their blue bodies. They live a more docile life than most wasps that you fear stinging you, in that they only sting if threatened to the point of being killed. That is because they are solitary wasps, rather living in a colony. They can’t afford to sting you and then die, because then there would not be any other wasp to protect their nest. The Blue Mud Dauber spends most of its day flying around and eating nectar and pollen. So, with a diet of nectar, how does this wasp help control the spider population around your house? It is the egg laying process that causes the Blue Mud Dauber to search for and paralyze spiders. It seems as if they prefer Black Widow Spiders, which is good news to us. Once the Blue Mud Dauber has mated it then seeks out an abandoned mud nest from another mud dauber to call home to a single egg. This is where the spiders come into the picture. This wasp will hunt spiders, sting them with venom that paralyzes them and bring them back to the nest. Once laying its egg, the Blue Mud Dauber then packs the mud tube full of spiders and seals it off for protection. Instead of killing the spiders this mud dauber is smart enough to only paralyze them so that they will not decompose fast, but rather stay alive in a state of paralysis so that they will stay fresh as long as possible. As the egg matures and hatched into a larva it then has a ready source of food to eat. The larva will overwinter in the sealed off tube, safe from any predators and plenty of spider food. As spring develops, the larva will continue to eat the spiders until it has eaten its way out of the nest as a Blue Mud Dauber adult. Then the whole process begins again; so goes the circle of life and more spider control.

Although the Blue Mud Dauber does assist with your Spider Pest Control, they do live in the unsightly mud tubes that you will find clinging to your house. So, it becomes the lesser of two evils; ugly mud tubes, but less spiders. However, if you happen to have an abundance of wasp issues around your home, or not enough Blue Mud Daubers to assist with a spider issue – call your local Nashville Pest Control specialist at Certified Pest Control. Our local family owned and operated company is happy to give you a free quotation, offer great and honest service and always just a phone call away for any issue you may have. Consider asking about our affordable yearlong pest prevention program; you will not be disappointed.

 

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Fiery Searcher

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Fiery Searcher

Caterpillar Hunter

The Fiery Searcher is a beautiful ground beetle that is about 1 1 2/” long and is also known as Calosoma Scrutator and Caterpillar Hunter. They are found all over the United States in areas with trees, rocks, firewood piles, fields, or even your garden. This beautiful beetle is also a resident of Nashville, Tennessee. It may be difficult to spot one because they tend to hide during the daytime and hunt at night. But if you are fortunate enough, you will witness a beautiful metallic green beetle with a slight pink border around the edges. Their heads are mostly a shiny black with accents of the same green color from on their bodies, along with black legs and antennae. The term “Fiery Seracher” came about fro seeing the flashes of green from their body, with the pinkish red border surrounding them as if they are luminous or fiery.

The thing that makes this ground beetle stand out is the help that is gives in gardens. Many gardeners are appreciative to have the Fiery Searcher living among their fruits, vegetables and flowers. As a resident of your garden the Fiery Searcher, can assist in keeping garden destroying pests in check. It is quite adept at doing so because unlike many other ground beetles, the Fiery Searcher will also climb stems, branches or tree trunks in search of their meal and they are very fast. They have strong jaws that could crush and eat much more sturdy prey; however the meal of choice is the caterpillar; thus the name “Caterpillar Hunter”. Caterpillars can be quite the garden destroyer, but not with the Fiery Searcher hiding around during daytime waiting for night to come and voraciously feed on as many caterpillars as it can find. Even the larva of this beetle hunts and eats caterpillars; as many as forty in their developmental stage of thirty days. They also feed on and help control potato beetles, eggs of maggots and flies, cabbage loopers, aphids, slugs, and even snails. They are your natural pest control for the garden.

They do have predators to contend with, such as Birds, frogs, raccoons, skunks. Their first line of defense is a strong odor that they can emit from their scent glands. The stinky smell can ward off some predators, however if the enemy is persistent, the Fiery Searcher will use their powerful jaws to bite their attacker and deliver a good pinch.

During the summer the female will lay a single egg. This egg will hatch in ten to twelve days and then go through 35 days of development from Larvae, Pupa to Adult. Some Fiery Searchers overwinter during this development process. Although most active from April to August, a development from egg to adult can happen in one year. This low birth rate and slow growth process make them somewhat rare but they make up for that with a very long lifespan of one to three years. Once fully developed they grow to be very large at a length of almost 1 ½” and over ½” wide.

Although the Carnivorous Fiery Searcher is lurking in wait for the Caterpillars to come out tonight, hopefully you will get a chance to see this beautiful helper in the garden. It is nice to have this natural creation as your garden pest control against caterpillars, however if your back yard has become home to other pests such as mosquitoes – call Certified Pest Control Nashville. We are a local family owned and operated business that will provide you with the level of service and trust that you deserve. If you are looking for Nashville Pest Control, search no more; call Certified Pest Control, LLC.

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Familiar Bluet

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Familiar Bluet

Hung By The Neck to Lay Eggs

The Familiar Bluet is a Damselfly that lives right here in Tennessee. They can be easily mistaken for a dragonfly, due to the similar appearance. But the main differences are to be noticed are that a Damselfly will have a bigger wingspan and upon closer inspection the dragonfly has a significant gap between their compound eyes. The Familiar Bluet is a beautiful color of blue, thus the fitting name. They generally have a black and blue striped head with its body being a fading blue with black spots at the segments and in between the segments of the body, all equally separated. They range in size from 1” to 1 ½” in body length and have four wings with a span of 1 ¾”.

They live for up to two years and always tend to live near a constant water source like lakes, ponds, creeks and streams. However they have been known to live in an area with a water source as small as a birdbath or large puddles. This damselfly requires water to use as its habitat, survival, mating and reproduction. The eggs of the female are laid under water by crawling down plants that surround the area, then depositing her eggs on the plant just below the surface of water. The female is able to stay under water for ten to fifteen minutes at a time and can take up to an hour to complete the egg laying process. At times the male and female will work together to lay the eggs; with the male hovering above and holding her by the neck with his tail to allow the underwater placement of the eggs. The eggs hatch and do not go through the transformation of many insects, rather they are born as miniature versions of the adults (called instars) and simply grow and molt in order to get larger. Living in the water these small damselflies feed on plants, algae, moss and other vegetation in their habitat. As they mature, they crawl back up the plants or swim to the shore and begin their lives as a small adult Familiar Bluet.

Familiar Bluet’s are carnivorous and feed on a variety of smaller insects such as flies, mosquitoes and ants. They fly over the water habitat watching for these insects looking for moisture, then go in for a vicious attack. They have been observed catching their prey then rabidly ripping the insects apart as they feed. But even though they may be vicious themselves, they do have predators to be on the lookout for. This same habitat is also home to frogs, lizards, snakes, birds and larger insects that feed on the Familiar Bluet. They only have one line of defense, speedy and quick aerial maneuvers in order to elude being caught.

The Familiar Bluet is not looked at as a Nashville Pest Control Issue; rather they can be quite helpful with controlling mosquito populations. However if you have a Pest Control issue here in Nashville, Certified Pest Control is always available to assist with identifying the proper control method for your pesky insect invasion. You can trust our local family to honestly and effectively treat your home and prevent pests all year long.

 

 

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