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Bug Fun Facts

Dog Day Cicada

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Dog Day Cicada

Why Do We See Cicadas Every Year?

Yes, you are hearing and seeing Cicadas here in Nashville, TN. Most people think that these invaders only come in large numbers during the thirteen and seventeen year intervals. The largest numbers do occur during the emerging of the next generations in 2021, 2024 and 2025 here in Nashville. However we do have annual Cicadas that appear every year, called Dog Day Cicadas. We begin to see and hear them as the hotter days of summer arrive, hence their name. They do not appear in numbers that are nowhere close to the periodical Cicadas of 13 and 17 years, but they show up every year, buzzing and clumsily flying into us, our cars and homes.

The main differences in the Dog Day and Periodical Cicadas are their color and appearance. The Dog Day Cicadas we are seeing now are slightly larger (at around 2” long) are a black or dark green in color and have black or dark brown eyes. They are also faster flyers than the periodicals. The periodical Cicadas that emerge in very large numbers can be immediately identified with their fear inspiring red eyes. Since the Dog Day Cicada does not arrive as a large army, they are not much concern to us other that possibly bumping into us and scaring us with that loud high pitched squeal. While we find the noise unnerving, it serves this Cicada with the mating process. You can step out in the late afternoon to early evening and hear a chorus of these vibrating loud males looking for their mates. The male is the one that makes this sound with their tymbals that are located in a hollow abdomen. These extreme vibrations inside a hollow structure is what makes their sound so loud, often carrying up to ½ mile through the quiet evening hours. This load vibration is meant to draw a suitable female for mating. Once this is accomplished the female will lay her eggs on tree branches that she cut notches in, to hold the eggs in place. In four to six weeks these eggs hatch and fall to the ground where they burrow and feed on tree and plant roots.

Even though we see these annual Dog Day Cicadas every year, it is only because their generations overlap. Each generation actually takes two to five years to develop into nymphs. These nymphs come back out of the ground and climb up tree and bush branches to complete their metamorphosis into to Cicadas. It is around these trees that we see the creepy looking exoskeletons, with one split in it for the fully developed Cicada to exit. The exoskeletons resemble creepy looking prehistoric bugs that we used to collect as kids to scare visiting grandparents (haha, good clean fun as kids). As adults we are also scared as they plunge at us screaming that loud song while mowing the lawn. These male Cicadas often misidentify the sound of our lawnmowers, weed eaters and leaf blowers as other males, so they want to join in the song to attract females. So beware on the mower, you may be mistaken as a large male Cicada singing your song and occasionally get hit by these speedy yet clumsy fliers.

The Dog Day Cicadas do eat tree sap and can cause minimal damage to tree and shrub limbs, but there numbers are so small it is not much to worry about. So, as you sit on your back porch during these dog days of summer in Nashville, TN, marvel at the extremely loud chorus being sung by the male Dog Day Cicada trying to locate his mate. Their bodies were created perfectly to amplify this long reaching mating call, and it is truly amazing.

Dog Day Cicadas are not a Nashville Pest Control Issue, but may sneak up on you for a quick startle. But the poor Cicada will only bumble off into the sky and look for a good place to land and sing his song. However if you do have other flying insect pests such as wasps, bees or yellow jackets call Certified Pest Control Nashville to inspect your property and provide a free estimate along with a control method to protect your family and home. Our local family is here to provide you the detailed and quality service that you can count on.

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Flesh Fly

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Flesh Fly

A Nasty Place to Be Born

Many people classify all flies the same, however there are more than 120,000 species. So the next time you simply think you have seen a common house fly, it could be one of many that exist. Flesh Flies are one species that are commonly misidentified as they look quite similar. The best way to identify the Flesh Fly is to count the number of black stripes on their abdomen. A house Fly has four stripes, whereas the Flesh Fly has three stripes. Now, it is quite rare that you would be able to ever get to examine a live one; you may be able to identify a dead Flesh Fly this way. Another distinguishing factor would be the fact that Flesh Flies primarily live outdoors where they have access to dung and decomposing plants and animals. However if you do notice a large population of these flies in your home, you may want to check and make sure that an animal has not died in your attic, wall void or crawl space. This would give the Flesh Fly and readily available food source and could cause your home to become a harbinger of these disease carriers.

Like most flies, the Flesh Fly does not have mouth parts that can bite, rather they have a sponge like mouth to feed on liquids. Flesh Flies do primarily feed on nectar, insect excrement and decomposing plants, however certain species will feed on flesh wounds of animals. This is where the Flesh Fly is quite grotesque in nature. When the new generation of overwintering Flesh Flies emerges in spring, they do so to mate and carry on the two to three generations of flies born per year. Once the female is fertilized the eggs actually hatch in the female and then are laid as maggots; as many as thirty at one time. The maggots do the dirty work. They are equipped with mouths that can eat flesh, and unlike the legless larvae of the house fly, the larvae of a Flesh Fly can move around and actually burrow into the meat they have been placed on. Some Flesh Fly species lay their eggs on plants to be eaten by caterpillars or other host insects. They also have been known to actually lay the eggs on an insect host, and then the larvae burrow into the insect to feed and grow through their developmental stages of one to three weeks.

Although Flesh Flies themselves do not transmit disease themselves, the environment that they live in with rotten plants, decaying flesh or open wounds of injured animals makes it a perfect carrier of disease. As with all insects and pests, cleanliness around the home is your best defense from any negative impact. If you notice a big population of Flesh Flies, check for dead animals or birds and have them removed. Other preventative measures you can take to protect yourself is always use screens if you keep windows or doors open, keep your trash away from the house and seal up any entry points in your home.

The Flesh Fly can be a Nashville Pest Control Issue, as with any species of fly. So make sure to call your local family here at Certified Pest Control if you are experiencing any pest issues. We are happy to properly diagnose a solution and provide free quotes to address the unwanted pests that have invaded your home.

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Hoverfly

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Hoverfly

A Gardner’s Friend

The Hoverfly is usually mistaken for a sweat bee or small honey bee, due to its size and colors. However, this harmless fly actually helps us by controlling the population of a well known Tennessee Pest; the aphid. Aphids can be annoying to gardeners, as they feed on the honeydew of plants. This sucks the life right out of vegetables, and you can see the damage from eaten leaves to completely dead plants. Aphids also cause other issues with the honeydew that they cannot digest, so they leave behind a residue. This residue will cover leaves causing death of plants, can cause mold growth and also attract other pests such as ants. So you see why we should love the Hoverfly. Many gardeners will actually plant white and yellow flowers or herbs among their fruit and vegetables to attract them. The Hoverfly will then assist by being a very efficient natural pest control with the use of their larvae.

Hoverflies can be identified by their black and yellow stripes (like a bee), small size of only up to ½” long and having only two wings. To further mimic a stinging insect, their wings have two darker stripes on the leading edge to make it look like they have four wings. When it rest, most predators will recognize this as a bee and stay away. But this is a fly, so it has no stinger. You can spot them hovering over flowers in order to gather nectar and are very important to the pollination process.

The Hoverfly female also helps further with the aphid control process, by locating and laying eggs near an area that has aphids. Once the eggs hatch in just a few days, they have an instant food source. Even as a larvae they can eat up to fifty aphids each, per day. That is a considerable amount for larvae with no legs, but they can still move fast. Adults do not eat the aphids, so it is the larvae that are the natural pest control at work. Larvae can consume four to five hundred aphids in their larval stage.  Then they spin a cocoon to grow into adults in just two weeks. An adult Hoverfly only lives two to four weeks and they do not overwinter, but rather die. This leaves the next generation in the ground waiting to hatch and continue life cycle next spring.

The Hoverfly is one of the true helpers of the insect world. They are relatively harmless, help with pollination only second to that of bees, and help control the aphid population of up to eighty or ninety percent of an infestation. Some Hoverfly populations have even been known to completely wipe out an aphid infestation harming a crop or garden. So, make sure to plant those white and yellow flowers, not to mention herbs such as oregano, cilantro, thyme and lemon balm so you can attract these beneficial flies.

Hoverflies are an insect you want around your house and garden, however if you are dealing with a Nashville Pest Control Issue of unwanted invaders, please give us a call. Certified Pest Control Nashville should be your first and only call to give you local family and owned personal service. Contact our family, to protect yours.

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Carolina Locust

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Carolina Locust

Dirt Colored Grasshopper

Locusts are often associated with plagues and total crop devastation; however the Carolina Locust is a different species and primarily feeds on weeds. They are one of the largest grasshoppers in the United States and can be as large as 2 ½” long with a wingspan of up to 4” wide. They live in most of our country and do inhabit Tennessee.

Many insects that we discuss are vivid with beautiful colors that make them stand out, however this is not the case with the Carolina Locust. Because they choose to live in areas of woods and live on the ground that is bare dirt, they use camouflage to blend in with their surroundings. Therefore this large grasshopper is bland tan or dirt colored in appearance. They do have a flash of color that can be seen, only when in flight; with a yellow border around their hind wings. Other than that small yellow stripe, they are just a plain dirt colored grasshopper. So, this plain color might not be pretty to look at, but it helps them to survive by blending in with their dirt habitat. Their other line of defense is by taking flight and quickly darting to a new hiding place from predators. Other grasshoppers are not so effective at flight, but with a large wingspan, the Carolina Locust can fly, hover and maneuver quite well while airborne. In a flight episode, they are able to fly as far as twenty to thirty feet. Even with their very good flying ability, they mostly inhabit the ground. After sheltering for the night; a Carolina Locust will come out into the sunshine to warm up for a few hours. They like warmer temperatures, so you will only see them during peak sunlight hours. Once warm they will go about their daily activity of walking and flying around their immediate area eating and searching for a mate. They are not a crop pest, although they have been known to damage certain corn, beans, potatoes and tobacco fields by eating the leaves.

The male will fly around and click his wings in order to attract a female. He will also find a nice patch of bare dirt to just sit and rub his hind legs together to attract the females. Once the Carolina Locust has found a mate, the female will lay up to 150 eggs in the dirt in summer. Typically these eggs will overwinter and hatch the next spring. As they hatch, the look like small locusts and molt several times in order to grow to adult size. By midsummer there is a whole other generation to begin their breeding again.

Even though the Carolina Locust is not a Tennessee Pest Control issue, they can be capable of causing considerable damage to grass and leaves around your property. You shouldn’t be too concerned about it, if you happen to see this bland colored grasshopper. However if you have other destructive, biting or stinging pests, please call Certified Pest Control Nashville. Our locally owned and operated company is happy to have one of our family visit your home to diagnose a treatment plan for your pest issue. Year round protection and preventative pest control is the best way to make sure that you stay pest free all year. Call Certified Pest Control today for a free estimate.

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False Potato Beetle

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False Potato Beetle

Close Relative of a Crop Destroyer

The False Potato Beetle is a resident here in Tennessee and very closely resembles the Colorado Potato Beetle. The biggest difference is that the Colorado Potato Beetle is very aggressive pest, voraciously feeding on potatoes that can actually destroy 100% of a crop depending on the infestation. There is also a slight variation in appearance, with the False Potato Beetle having a different color stripe on its wings and more spots on the head. They range in size from ¼” to ½” in length is a shade of orange with alternating stripes of black and white with yellow stripes in between.

False Potato Beetles do still feed on potatoes; however here in Tennessee their diet is has more variety. They have been known to also feed on ground cherries, horse nettle, husk tomatoes and bittersweet (a creeping vine that has clusters of yellow flowers and small bittersweet berries).  Although they do breed prolifically, they are not considered a Tennessee Pest Control Issue like they are out West.

After the overwinter process, the adult emerges from the ground and begin to feed on surrounding leaves. During this process they are also seeking out potential mates. Once they mate the female can lay abundance of eggs; up to 500 eggs in four weeks. These eggs are placed on the underneath of leaves where they undergo the growth process of four stages to reach adulthood. All of this happens in a short timeframe of 2 to 3 weeks. So, you see the reason that populations can grow do rapidly, as each egg can grow to be an egg producing adult within twenty to thirty days. They cause damage from hatching all the way to adult, by feeding on the surrounding leaves.

They don’t really have a natural defense, other than play dead. If you happen upon one and disturb it, the beetle will fall over on its side and lay completely still as to look dead. This is not a very effective defense, so they are easy prey, although not many predators. Ground beetles, spiders and wasps are the primary predators that feed on the Potato Beetle and its eggs. One species of Ground Beetle can eat 20 – 30 eggs per day, making it a good control predator of the Potato Beetle.

As we do not have large Potato crops in Tennessee, our False Potato Beetle is not a huge pest control concern, other than some tomato plant damage. In some of the Western United States, with the Colorado Potato Beetle, it is a major concern and most of the issue is handled through crop rotation. This serves as damage control by moving the crops in a way that will move the food source of a potato beetle infestation and thus cause the beetles to relocate to a new area to find the potatoes. They don’t relocate well, because the adults have to walk to the new food source which kills approximately ninety percent of the population of an infestation. So, by rotating the crops and relocating the new potato field up to 1/2 mile will get rid of most these slow walking crop destroyers. Also, the overwintering adults that typically emerge to start the breeding season will not have the initial food source that they need to survive, thus reducing the first generation of the year to a very low amount.

Other than the occasional damage to tomatoes or flowering plants such as bittersweet and night shade, the False Potato Beetle does not typically fall into a pest control issue here in Tennessee. However if you are having issues with our typical Tennessee summer pests such as ants, spiders, wasps, mosquitoes, fleas or even bed bugs – make sure to give Certified Pest Control Nashville a call for a free estimate. We are all family here, and offer the personal, detailed service you deserve.

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European Hornet

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European Hornet

European Hornet in Tennessee

The European Hornet are some of the largest hornets we have here in Tennessee. They can reach a total length of 1 ½” long, are brown and have black and yellow stripes on their bodies. As they are quite alarming due to their huge size, you should avoid them as they can deliver a very powerful sting. They are native to Europe, thus the name. However sometime in the 1800’s they were introduced to the United States as this country was being settled and had new visitors bringing them here.

The European Hornet is considered a Nashville, Tennessee Pest Control issue if they choose to enter or make your home, their home. Primarily the European Hornet choose to live in wooded areas, making nests from tree trunks or hollow trees. However in our overbuilt cities, so many insects look for openings to homes which can provide them the same safe harbor to live, breed and raise young. The nest is usually a paper nest that the Hornet workers build by chewing up natural material found in the area, then gluing it all together with their saliva. This construction is not only a uniform comb type design, but also the material it is made from protects it from water and wind by being so well built. The hard work of the worker European Hornets is to protect the hive, and most importantly the queen. Most nests will contain up to 500 workers and will attack aggressively if they are threatened.

The whole life process begins in Spring, when the Queen emerges and looks for a good place to build a nest. She begins by chewing up material and gluing it together, just like the workers, however at this time she is alone and building her own nest to begin laying eggs. Once these first eggs hatch, they will begin the first group of sterile workers that have one sole purpose – to continue building the nest, raising the next generation and protecting the queen. In late Summer, female Hornets with the ability to reproduce will be born in order to be fertilized. Male Hornets will also be hatched at this time to continue the reproductive process of producing new queens that overwinter and emerge the next Spring to begin this whole life cycle over again, in a new nest.

European Hornets have a variety of diet; however they tend to be predators hunting Flies, Bees, Wasps, Yellow Jackets and Grasshoppers. They also have a sweet tooth, looking for and feeding of fruit producing trees. But most of the time you will find them peacefully living around their colony and nest. They are often feared because of their size, and they can deliver quite the sting, but generally it is compared to a powerful Bee sting. That being the case, there has been cases of stings sending people to the hospital with headaches and heart conditions, so respect the nest and stay far way to avoid any adverse affects from a European Hornet sting.

If you notice any Wasps, Bees or Hornets entering and exiting your home, there is no doubt a nest. So, make sure to call a professional to deal with these stinging pests. We at Certified Pest Control Nashville are happy to assist you with a free pest prevention plan. Our Local family business is here to give you the honest and effective service you deserve.

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Flower Longhorn Beetle

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Flower Longhorn Beetle

Beetle that looks like a wasp

Most beetles are considered to be round or oval, with a hard shell like the lady beetle or ground beetle. However the Flower Longhorn Beetle is a beautiful species of Cerambycidae with a long and slender body, very long antennae and bright colors to mimic more dangerous flying pests in the garden.

The most striking feature of the Flower Longhorn Beetle is their long antennae, which can be as long as the entire body. These long antennae are the reason that they gained the name Longhorn Beetle. Their bodies  can reach up to 3/4” in length, with the antennae making an entire length of up to 1 ½”. They can develop in different color patterns, depending on the species, but here in Tennessee we will primarily see the black and yellow combination. With wings, a slender body and bright black and yellow markings they can be mistaken for a wasp or yellow jacket. That is part of their defense; to mimic or pretend to be a stinging wasp in order to scare off predators. Couple the masquerade of a dangerous stinger with a hard shell of a beetle, and they are well protected. And they need this, as they are hunted by predators such as birds, wasps or ground reptiles.

The Flower Longhorn Beetle can be spotted in peak months of summer. During June and July they prefer to fly around and survey open fields next to wooded areas in search of pollen from flowers such as the Rose and Aster family. During these months they mate, and the female lays eggs underneath the bark of trees. They do this, because the eggs hatch into larvae that need decaying wood to feed on. Some species actually feed on live trees and can cause damage to fruit bearing trees. The larvae bore into the wood and use this nutrition to develop over the next two to three months into an adult, however some species have the ability to stay dormant for up to two or three years before they develop into adults. Although some larvae damage live fruit trees, the larvae that feed on decaying wood, or old tree stumps actually contribute to the environment by allowing holes to be bored and quicken the decomposing process and making room for new plants to grow and replace the dead ones. They will actually inhabit the same stumps or decaying trees for years, never leaving and allowing generations to lay eggs, bore and continue their life cycles right there in the same tree.

The Flower Longhorn Beetle is most numerous in the tropics; however we do have the black and yellow variety right here in Nashville, Tennessee. They are not considered to be a Nashville Pest Control issue, but we definitely have our share of pests to be concerned about. Certified Pest Control Nashville is your local family owned and operated 5 – Star rated first choice to call. Contact our family to receive a free quote on year round pest prevention. Our rates and level of service cannot be beat, so give us a call at Certified Pest Control, LLC.

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Fiery Searcher

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Fiery Searcher

Caterpillar Hunter

The Fiery Searcher is a beautiful ground beetle that is about 1 1 2/” long and is also known as Calosoma Scrutator and Caterpillar Hunter. They are found all over the United States in areas with trees, rocks, firewood piles, fields, or even your garden. This beautiful beetle is also a resident of Nashville, Tennessee. It may be difficult to spot one because they tend to hide during the daytime and hunt at night. But if you are fortunate enough, you will witness a beautiful metallic green beetle with a slight pink border around the edges. Their heads are mostly a shiny black with accents of the same green color from on their bodies, along with black legs and antennae. The term “Fiery Seracher” came about fro seeing the flashes of green from their body, with the pinkish red border surrounding them as if they are luminous or fiery.

The thing that makes this ground beetle stand out is the help that is gives in gardens. Many gardeners are appreciative to have the Fiery Searcher living among their fruits, vegetables and flowers. As a resident of your garden the Fiery Searcher, can assist in keeping garden destroying pests in check. It is quite adept at doing so because unlike many other ground beetles, the Fiery Searcher will also climb stems, branches or tree trunks in search of their meal and they are very fast. They have strong jaws that could crush and eat much more sturdy prey; however the meal of choice is the caterpillar; thus the name “Caterpillar Hunter”. Caterpillars can be quite the garden destroyer, but not with the Fiery Searcher hiding around during daytime waiting for night to come and voraciously feed on as many caterpillars as it can find. Even the larva of this beetle hunts and eats caterpillars; as many as forty in their developmental stage of thirty days. They also feed on and help control potato beetles, eggs of maggots and flies, cabbage loopers, aphids, slugs, and even snails. They are your natural pest control for the garden.

They do have predators to contend with, such as Birds, frogs, raccoons, skunks. Their first line of defense is a strong odor that they can emit from their scent glands. The stinky smell can ward off some predators, however if the enemy is persistent, the Fiery Searcher will use their powerful jaws to bite their attacker and deliver a good pinch.

During the summer the female will lay a single egg. This egg will hatch in ten to twelve days and then go through 35 days of development from Larvae, Pupa to Adult. Some Fiery Searchers overwinter during this development process. Although most active from April to August, a development from egg to adult can happen in one year. This low birth rate and slow growth process make them somewhat rare but they make up for that with a very long lifespan of one to three years. Once fully developed they grow to be very large at a length of almost 1 ½” and over ½” wide.

Although the Carnivorous Fiery Searcher is lurking in wait for the Caterpillars to come out tonight, hopefully you will get a chance to see this beautiful helper in the garden. It is nice to have this natural creation as your garden pest control against caterpillars, however if your back yard has become home to other pests such as mosquitoes – call Certified Pest Control Nashville. We are a local family owned and operated business that will provide you with the level of service and trust that you deserve. If you are looking for Nashville Pest Control, search no more; call Certified Pest Control, LLC.

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Familiar Bluet

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Familiar Bluet

Hung By The Neck to Lay Eggs

The Familiar Bluet is a Damselfly that lives right here in Tennessee. They can be easily mistaken for a dragonfly, due to the similar appearance. But the main differences are to be noticed are that a Damselfly will have a bigger wingspan and upon closer inspection the dragonfly has a significant gap between their compound eyes. The Familiar Bluet is a beautiful color of blue, thus the fitting name. They generally have a black and blue striped head with its body being a fading blue with black spots at the segments and in between the segments of the body, all equally separated. They range in size from 1” to 1 ½” in body length and have four wings with a span of 1 ¾”.

They live for up to two years and always tend to live near a constant water source like lakes, ponds, creeks and streams. However they have been known to live in an area with a water source as small as a birdbath or large puddles. This damselfly requires water to use as its habitat, survival, mating and reproduction. The eggs of the female are laid under water by crawling down plants that surround the area, then depositing her eggs on the plant just below the surface of water. The female is able to stay under water for ten to fifteen minutes at a time and can take up to an hour to complete the egg laying process. At times the male and female will work together to lay the eggs; with the male hovering above and holding her by the neck with his tail to allow the underwater placement of the eggs. The eggs hatch and do not go through the transformation of many insects, rather they are born as miniature versions of the adults (called instars) and simply grow and molt in order to get larger. Living in the water these small damselflies feed on plants, algae, moss and other vegetation in their habitat. As they mature, they crawl back up the plants or swim to the shore and begin their lives as a small adult Familiar Bluet.

Familiar Bluet’s are carnivorous and feed on a variety of smaller insects such as flies, mosquitoes and ants. They fly over the water habitat watching for these insects looking for moisture, then go in for a vicious attack. They have been observed catching their prey then rabidly ripping the insects apart as they feed. But even though they may be vicious themselves, they do have predators to be on the lookout for. This same habitat is also home to frogs, lizards, snakes, birds and larger insects that feed on the Familiar Bluet. They only have one line of defense, speedy and quick aerial maneuvers in order to elude being caught.

The Familiar Bluet is not looked at as a Nashville Pest Control Issue; rather they can be quite helpful with controlling mosquito populations. However if you have a Pest Control issue here in Nashville, Certified Pest Control is always available to assist with identifying the proper control method for your pesky insect invasion. You can trust our local family to honestly and effectively treat your home and prevent pests all year long.

 

 

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Click Beetle

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Click Beetle

A Clumsy Acrobat

Click Beetles are best known for the acrobatic click flip they do in order to get back on their feet. This beetle is usually about ½” to 1” long, with hard shell bodies, two – main sections of a body and six legs. Although the adult Click Beetle is not categorized as much of a pest in Nashville, they will invade your homes at night trough cracks and crevices. Being nocturnal during the warm months, they are drawn to light, thus the reason they can find their way into your home. They usually live in wood piles, soil, mulch and around on the ground where they feed on roots, nectar, flowers, seeds or aphids. More than likely though, you will only encounter one, by hearing the loud clicking noise they make if they are upside down on your wood or tile floor trying to get them back erect. No need to worry though, as they are generally harmless and you can simply scoop them up and let them back outside where they belong.

Although the adult Click Beetle is not a pest or harmful, their larvae can be a pest to crops. As they mate, and the female eventually lay eggs, the eggs hatch into larvae. These larvae are called wire worms and can be harmful as they eat and damage the roots and leaves of Corn Crops. They can take one year to three years to develop from larvae to adult, so a lot of eating and damage can be done to these crops as they grow. Producing up to two generations a year and depending on species, they have a lifespan of one to three years. During their lifespan living on the ground, they are prey to different predators such as birds, moles, spiders and lizards. So, they also contribute to the food chain.

The Click Beetle‘s most interesting characteristic is the clicking mechanism that they posses. They have a snap or notch between the first and second section of their thorax. When threatened or touched the Click Beetle will play dead, and quickly roll over on its back. The problem is that they do not have long enough legs, or maneuverability to roll back over. So the Click Beetle bends in a way that allows the notch and pin to become unlocked and release a powerful click. This click catapults the beetle two to ten inches into the air to get back on their feet. The only issue with this ingenious ability is that other than controlling the actual click, they cannot control how far or where they will click. So, in self defense the Click Beetle pretends to be dead and lays on its back, then begins the random gamble of being able to accurately get back to its feet. As they click far up in the air, they are like uncontrollable acrobats doing somersaults. Studies have shown the beetle to accomplish four to six flips end over end, until they land. Therefore it is by absolute random odds that they actually land upright and may take several tries before they are successful.

The Click Beetle is an interesting and clumsy acrobat to observe, but not a Nashville Pest Control problem for homeowners. If you notice other pests that have wandered their way into your home, call Certified Pest Control Nashville to perform a free inspection to define and address your issue. Our local family is pleased to serve our neighbors, and give you a level of service that will make you happy to become part of our extended family.

 

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