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Familiar Bluet

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Familiar Bluet

Hung By The Neck to Lay Eggs

The Familiar Bluet is a Damselfly that lives right here in Tennessee. They can be easily mistaken for a dragonfly, due to the similar appearance. But the main differences are to be noticed are that a Damselfly will have a bigger wingspan and upon closer inspection the dragonfly has a significant gap between their compound eyes. The Familiar Bluet is a beautiful color of blue, thus the fitting name. They generally have a black and blue striped head with its body being a fading blue with black spots at the segments and in between the segments of the body, all equally separated. They range in size from 1” to 1 ½” in body length and have four wings with a span of 1 ¾”.

They live for up to two years and always tend to live near a constant water source like lakes, ponds, creeks and streams. However they have been known to live in an area with a water source as small as a birdbath or large puddles. This damselfly requires water to use as its habitat, survival, mating and reproduction. The eggs of the female are laid under water by crawling down plants that surround the area, then depositing her eggs on the plant just below the surface of water. The female is able to stay under water for ten to fifteen minutes at a time and can take up to an hour to complete the egg laying process. At times the male and female will work together to lay the eggs; with the male hovering above and holding her by the neck with his tail to allow the underwater placement of the eggs. The eggs hatch and do not go through the transformation of many insects, rather they are born as miniature versions of the adults (called instars) and simply grow and molt in order to get larger. Living in the water these small damselflies feed on plants, algae, moss and other vegetation in their habitat. As they mature, they crawl back up the plants or swim to the shore and begin their lives as a small adult Familiar Bluet.

Familiar Bluet’s are carnivorous and feed on a variety of smaller insects such as flies, mosquitoes and ants. They fly over the water habitat watching for these insects looking for moisture, then go in for a vicious attack. They have been observed catching their prey then rabidly ripping the insects apart as they feed. But even though they may be vicious themselves, they do have predators to be on the lookout for. This same habitat is also home to frogs, lizards, snakes, birds and larger insects that feed on the Familiar Bluet. They only have one line of defense, speedy and quick aerial maneuvers in order to elude being caught.

The Familiar Bluet is not looked at as a Nashville Pest Control Issue; rather they can be quite helpful with controlling mosquito populations. However if you have a Pest Control issue here in Nashville, Certified Pest Control is always available to assist with identifying the proper control method for your pesky insect invasion. You can trust our local family to honestly and effectively treat your home and prevent pests all year long.

 

 

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False Chinch Bug

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False Chinch Bug

A Two Week Invasion

The False Chinch Bug is a small bug that can cause a lot of worry that you can literally do nothing about. This small bug only measuring 1/8” long will emerge in spring in an absolute infestation stage if the environment is right. Millions of them have been reported in problem areas, and there is not much you can do but wait them out and allow them to leave.

The False Chinch Bug is primarily a field or crop insect. They feed on weed overgrowth by biting into the plants with their mouths and suck the sap out for their food source. This can cause damage, but not enough to be considered a pest. So, what is so interesting about this small insect? The sheer numbers at which they can appear in an area is alarming. After a wet winter that promotes heavy weed growth, the overwintering generation hatch into five different nymph stages before they become adults. The adults emerge with a voracious appetite to consume the sap from the surrounding weeds. The obvious solution would be to remove the weeds from an area to prevent this mass of insects. However, if the natural food source is removed, they will migrate to corn, fruit trees, and even your flowers or vegetables surrounding your house. This is where the annoying problem begins. The False Chinch bug can travel with a group of millions of other relatives to the food source, and if that is near your house you will know it. Reports have been made of swarms that actually look like brown carpets moving all across the ground, making it look as if the ground is moving. To make things worse, they have wings and can also fly in swarms with millions of these short term pests on the ground and filling the sky. The False Chinch Bug does not bite or cause any harm to people, other than the annoying numbers taking over your space.

The other issue with trying to control this short lived infestation is that you can do nothing much about it. You can use a water hose to knock down the flyers, and push back the carpet of ground intruders from your living space, but that is about it. Traps have been known to be overwhelmed within minutes, due to their tremendous numbers. Pesticides do not work, as they are immune to them and only cause a bigger problem. The False Chinch Bug will get covered with the pesticide, not be affected and then eliminate natural predators from eating them. Naturally this bug is eaten by birds and other insects, but the pesticide covering their food source will now keep them from eating them. So, this will only stop the one thing that could help control some of the infestation, natural predators, from knocking down the numbers. The best news is that the swarms of False Chinch Bugs will only last about two weeks. So, keep your doors and windows closed, use a vacuum to suck up any that have gotten into your home and as with any home invading insect make sure to seal up any cracks, gaps or areas that they could gain entry into your home. Then simply deal with these short two week visitors, until they die and provide the birds and other insects a large meal to clean up this mess.

The False Chinch Bug lives in Tennessee but does not generally show up in numbers as large as it does in Southwestern states. It may be immune to being controlled, but other insects may be bugging you and be a Nashville Pest Control Issue. If you are experiencing uninvited guests such as Mosquitoes, Ants, Roaches, Spiders, Fleas, Ticks, Bed Bugs or other pests – Call Certified Pest Control Nashville for a free evaluation of how to keep your home pest free year round with our quarterly pest prevention program. Local, friendly, honest service is what you deserve; so choose our Certified Pest Control Family for quality and thorough service.

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Dogbane Leaf Beetle

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Dogbane Leaf Beetle

Beautiful Poison Producing Beetle

The Dogbane Leaf Beetle is a beautiful resident of Tennessee. As you may be walking along trails or at the edge of creek banks, you may notice this jewel of a beetle. Where the path ends, and weeds begin are Indian hemp and Dogbane plants. It is these very plants that you can see the Dogbane Leaf Beetle sitting out in the open, as if daring a predator to strike. They would be easy targets, as they do not use camouflage or blend in with the surroundings; rather the Dogbane Leaf Beetle is a bright iridescent blue green that stands out. What makes their appearance so brilliant is their outer shell that is made up of many different shells. Each shell is designed to be at a different angle, which makes the light reflecting from the beetle to appear different colors depending on the direction you are admiring. What appears as a dark blue will slowly change to a bright green as you walk by and change the angle of light. The Dogbane Leaf Beetle is a marvel of creation and an amazing insect to find.

However the Dogbane Leaf Beetle has even more interesting characteristics to help it survive. They feed on Dogbane plants which are poisonous humans and animals, but store it rather than ingest it. As any creature breaks the skin of the Dogbane plant, it will release a milky substance that can poison the predator. As this poison is eaten, it slowly hardens and can get sticky enough to deter an insect from further eating due to the fact that their mouth can’t work properly.  But the inventive Dogbane Leaf Beetle knows this, so it eats until this sticky concoction begins to get in its mouth, then slowly walks backwards and wipes its mouth on the plant to prevent getting a mean case of lock jaw. This beetle also is smart enough to walk backwards when cleaning its mouth, to prevent walking through the sticky mess and spreading it to more parts of the plant, making it inedible, or getting its legs stuck in the gum. The Dogbane Beetle then finds a fresh clean spot to resume eating the leaves and avoid the milky mess. It is in these leaves that the beetle takes in the nutrients that it needs to survive, but separates the poisonous portion to internal glands to use for defense at a later time. That is why this colorful easy target can feed out in the open; if a predator dares to try and bite, the Dogbane Leaf Beetle then releases the poison to survive an attack.

During their short lifespan of about 8 weeks, they live in small groups to mate. The male will find multiple partners during his adult life, mate at least once per day and then ride on the females back to protect her from other males trying to fertilize her. At this point the female will lay her eggs under a leaf where they will hatch and fall to the ground and feed upon roots of the plants that they inhabit. No adult stays around to protect the young ones as they develop, they are left to fend for themselves as each generation is born at a rate of one per year and only two to three eggs per female.

The Dogbane Leaf Beetle may be a pest to the plants that they feed on, but they are not generally considered a pest to homeowners. If you do experience problems with other beetles invading your home, or have additional Nashville Pest Control issues call us. Certified Pest Control Nashville, Tennessee is your local family of choice to provide quality, thorough services to protect your home. Call today for a free quotation to prevent Nashville pests year round.

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Click Beetle

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Click Beetle

A Clumsy Acrobat

Click Beetles are best known for the acrobatic click flip they do in order to get back on their feet. This beetle is usually about ½” to 1” long, with hard shell bodies, two – main sections of a body and six legs. Although the adult Click Beetle is not categorized as much of a pest in Nashville, they will invade your homes at night trough cracks and crevices. Being nocturnal during the warm months, they are drawn to light, thus the reason they can find their way into your home. They usually live in wood piles, soil, mulch and around on the ground where they feed on roots, nectar, flowers, seeds or aphids. More than likely though, you will only encounter one, by hearing the loud clicking noise they make if they are upside down on your wood or tile floor trying to get them back erect. No need to worry though, as they are generally harmless and you can simply scoop them up and let them back outside where they belong.

Although the adult Click Beetle is not a pest or harmful, their larvae can be a pest to crops. As they mate, and the female eventually lay eggs, the eggs hatch into larvae. These larvae are called wire worms and can be harmful as they eat and damage the roots and leaves of Corn Crops. They can take one year to three years to develop from larvae to adult, so a lot of eating and damage can be done to these crops as they grow. Producing up to two generations a year and depending on species, they have a lifespan of one to three years. During their lifespan living on the ground, they are prey to different predators such as birds, moles, spiders and lizards. So, they also contribute to the food chain.

The Click Beetle‘s most interesting characteristic is the clicking mechanism that they posses. They have a snap or notch between the first and second section of their thorax. When threatened or touched the Click Beetle will play dead, and quickly roll over on its back. The problem is that they do not have long enough legs, or maneuverability to roll back over. So the Click Beetle bends in a way that allows the notch and pin to become unlocked and release a powerful click. This click catapults the beetle two to ten inches into the air to get back on their feet. The only issue with this ingenious ability is that other than controlling the actual click, they cannot control how far or where they will click. So, in self defense the Click Beetle pretends to be dead and lays on its back, then begins the random gamble of being able to accurately get back to its feet. As they click far up in the air, they are like uncontrollable acrobats doing somersaults. Studies have shown the beetle to accomplish four to six flips end over end, until they land. Therefore it is by absolute random odds that they actually land upright and may take several tries before they are successful.

The Click Beetle is an interesting and clumsy acrobat to observe, but not a Nashville Pest Control problem for homeowners. If you notice other pests that have wandered their way into your home, call Certified Pest Control Nashville to perform a free inspection to define and address your issue. Our local family is pleased to serve our neighbors, and give you a level of service that will make you happy to become part of our extended family.

 

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Crab Spider

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Crab Spider

Spider that Changes Colors to Look Like a Flower

Crab Spiders can be quite hard to spot, as you can see in the above picture. Unlike many spiders, the Crab Spider does not spin a web and wait for prey to be caught, rather they are hunters. The way that the Crab Spider hunts its prey is through camouflage and imitation to be a part of a flower or plant. In many cases the spider will actually display a bright color of white or yellow in order to look like a flower itself. Therefore they crawl up a plant stem find a good spot for other pollinators to land, and then over a period of a day or two they can change colors to look like the surrounding flowers. They blend in so well, that a bee will land on what they see as a flower, which is actually a Crab Spider waiting for its next meal. They are so adept at camouflage that they even reflect the same ultraviolet wavelength of the flower they are pretending to be. The Crab Spider also can find even more success in areas where flowers may not exist. Pollinators are desperately seeking flowers, so with the ability to look like a flower and reflect the same UV as a flower they would stand out in a field of plants with one lone flower. The one lone flower would be the successful pretender, a Crab Spider waiting for a flying pollinator to land.

The Crab Spider has eight eyes, eight legs, long front legs that extend like crab pincers and powerful fangs to do battle with fierce stinging prey. They also can walk in any direction, including sideways like a crab. Once caught, they inject their prey with venom from their fangs that makes the battle into an easier fight to win and make a delicious meal. The Crab Spider feeds on Bumble Bees, Honey Bees, Wasps, Butterflies, Flies, Mosquitoes and Moths. They are day hunters, although you might not see them very well, due to their camouflage and small size. They are only about ¼” in size, with the female being larger than the male. She is larger in order to carry and produce young, and the male is thought to be smaller in order to move quicker in pursuit of his mate. Once the Crab Spiders have mated, she lays eggs on the wooded floor, spins a cocoon around them and covers them until they hatch. The female stays and protects her eggs for up to three weeks when they hatch. Shortly after the miniature Crab Spiders hatch, the mother dies. Since the babies are hatched as fully formed adults, they shed their skin as they grow in order to reach full size, and begin looking for a mate to start the generation. Generally most of this species mate in the summer, then produce the next generation which on average live one to two years.

The Crab Spider is not aggressive unless threatened, and their bite is not been found to be threatening to humans. So, even though this Crab Spider does help with pest control in your back yard, killing pesky mosquitoes, it is not considered a household pest. However; if you notice other spiders, spider webs, or if the Crab Spider is not controlling your Mosquito population, call Certified Pest Control. Our Local family owned and operated small business is happy to solve any of your Nashville Pest Control issues. We always take our time to give quality, effective services. Choose local; choose Certified Pest Control.

 

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Crane Fly

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Crane Fly

Giant Mosquito?

What is this Giant Mosquito that has invaded your house? The Crane Fly is most often mistaken for an extra large Mosquito flying around your porch lights; or inside clumsily bumping into walls as it is drawn to your interior lighting. They can be quite intimidating to see, due to their size, thus the nickname many have given to this species of “Mosquito Hawk”. Crane Flies are often spotted in the spring. Their large bodies and long leg span makes it very difficult for them to fly, so they seem to be flying with no purpose or control. The Crane Fly is identified by the appearance of a large mosquito, with bodies of up to three inches long, six long legs and one set of wings that can span two to three inches. The female has a thicker body, to accommodate eggs during mating and a tip at the end of their abdomen that looks like a stinger but is for laying eggs.

The Crane Fly has over 10,000 different species, but many share the same characteristics and life span. With an urban myth of being a mosquito eater, many species of the Crane Fly don’t even eat. They only have a lifespan of up to two weeks, and literally hatch to mate. Once a male and female have successfully mated, the female will lay up to two hundred eggs in water. Then the male and female die within a two week period. They generally live around lakes, rivers, streams and wet swampy areas. So the eggs hatch in two to three weeks under water and then live underground as they eat and develop through their stages of life. This is when the Crane Fly does it’s only eating. During the larvae stage they are called leather jackets due to their appearance, and they feed heavily on wood, roots, grass, flowers and other vegetation. They need this food in order to become adults and sustain them for the two week period of life they will have as a non eating adult. The Crane Fly larvae develop into pupae that feed for two months before they make a cocoon to overwinter by hibernating until they hatch in spring. The newly hatched adults then begin this new but very short lifespan.

With such a short lifespan, what is the purpose of the Crane Fly? As with many things in nature, it is simply the food chain that this insect seems to contribute its existence to. Birds, other insects and fish are happy to use the dead bodies of the Crane Fly as a source of food. Living close to many streams and rivers, the Crane Fly is such a popular food source to trout that many flies and lures have been made for use by fisherman. With the Crane Fly having such a large diameter of fully extended legs, light weight and fine hairs on its structure, it can actually land on water without sinking. This is when the trout can dart in for the meal, and they do, dead or alive. The dead bodies of Crane Flies that do not get eaten also contribute to the eco system of forests by decomposing into the ground to make rich soil for plant growth.

It seems to be such a short life with the sole reason for living, is to mate for a next generation. However, many things in our environment benefit from this clumsy fly that is commonly mistaken for a large mosquito. So, don’t be afraid when you have a Crane Fly bumping around the house, this harmless insect cannot bite and is only using its short life to find a mate.

The Crane Fly is not a Nashville Pest Control issue; however the insect that it is most mistaken for, the mosquito, definitely is. So if you have Mosquitoes that are bothering you around your home, please call Certified Pest Control Nashville to identify your problem areas and define a treatment plan to reduce this pesky biter. Our family is always happy to help, so give Certified Pest Control a call for the personal service you deserve.

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Tiger Moth

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Tiger Moth

A Moth that can Jam Sonar

The Tiger Moth has over 250 different species in its North American family. Here in Tennessee, we have the Banded Tiger Moth as a resident. They are a medium sized moth with bold patterns and many with an underlying bright coloring when they have their wings spread. They are nocturnal in nature, so they lay flat in undetectable hiding places, using the patterns in their wings to blend in until night comes. They are then busy feeding on different crops, bushes and trees. Some species feed on different plants that actually make them taste bad or even produce poisonous fluids to ward off predators. However it is not the bad taste or threat of poison that protects some species of the Tiger Moth.

It has been proven that several species of the Tiger Moth can actually jam radar. This is a very useful defense due to the fact that they are nocturnal and their main predator at night are bats. Bats use echo locating sonar to target their potential prey. However the Tiger Moth possesses a tymbal organ that produces clicks. These clicks are produced when being hunted. As the predator bat emits the echo locating sonar, the Tiger Moth will emit a click that confuses the bat, thus jamming its sonar where it cannot locate the moth in flight. Some have theorized that these clicks are warning sounds In order to scare off the bat. However, this has actually been proven by scientists who have conducted studies with moths that have had their tymbal organs removed. When observed with other moths that naturally posses the tymbal organs, the rate Tiger Moths caught by the bats are proof that this sonar jamming click actually works.  Most all of the moths that had the tymbal organs could click, jam and evade, whereas the moths without the tymbal organ were mostly caught by the predator bat.

This tymbal organ has also been observed to be used while mating. The Tiger Moth has two or three generations per year. Once the overwintering Tiger Moth makes its appearance, it needs to mate quickly due to the fact that they only live for a few days. They need to find a mate and lay eggs quickly. So the female flies while emitting pheromones to attract a male. With the male Tiger Moth flying downwind, he can pick up on this pheromone trail to get a closer location. Then the tymbal organs are used again, but this time for mating instead of defense. The male will emit a click with the female answering until they can find each other to mate and produce another generation.  They lay their eggs on the underside of leaves, then after a few days she dies. The spring eggs produce a summer generation, with the summer eggs producing the over wintering spring generation for next year. These eggs eventually produce a caterpillar that emerges into this beautiful moth. The caterpillar of some species of the Tiger Moth is called woollybears.  The woollybears are quite popular in some areas of the Southeast United States, due to the fact that they are believed to predict how severe a winter may be. People gather to see if the woollybear is more brown or black. This practice has become so popular that festivals are held in Kentucky and North Carolina, specifically dedicated to the woollybear. This event is actually much like the well known Groundhog Day, where the nation watches to see if winter is over or not, based on the groundhog.

Although the Tiger Moth and its caterpillar may cause some damage to crops or bushes, they are not considered to be a well know pest control issue here in Nashville, Tennessee. The Banded Tiger Moth can be a beautiful and quite skilled insect to try and spot. However if you happen to encounter a Nashville Pest Control issue, please call the local family you can trust – Certified Pest Control. We are happy to offer a free inspection to properly identify the solution to keep your home pest free.

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Candy Striped Leafhopper

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Candy Striped Leafhopper

A Beautiful but Ravenous Over Eater

While many insects rely on camouflage and using every method possible to blend in with their natural surroundings in order to survive, the Candy Striped Leafhopper does the exact opposite. As a matter of fact, they could possibly be the most brilliantly colored insect in North America. Not only do they display a bright color, but a beautiful display of four or five colors in a design that appears as if it has been created by an artist. Although they may be so brightly colored and beautiful to look at, you may have to exert quite the effort to get a good look.

They may be bright, but they are also small and quick. With an adult measuring at just 3/8”, you have to have a keen eye. Couple that fact with their large hind legs well designed for quickly jumping long distances, and they are a speedy little insect to see. Their jumping ability has been reported to propel their small 3/8” body up to fifteen inches in a single and quick hop. That would equate to a human being able to jump up to 240’; an incredible jump indeed. So, when walking through flowers and blackberry bushes in particular, keep watch, you may see one of our most beautiful insects in Tennessee.

Although the amazing color scheme and incredible jumping ability may make this insect interesting enough, it is their eating habits that can be hard to believe. As a general rule the Candy Striped Leafhopper is a herbivores, using their mouth parts to actually suck the juices out of a plant or leaf, rather than eating it. And like a starving man at a buffet, their appetites are ravenous. Once they start eating they will not stop, even though they are stuffed beyond what their bodies can process or hold. Therefore, they eat and eat and eat the delicious plant juices they desire. Rather than stop eating, these juices just build up until they are forced from their bodies and literally pop out of their rear ends. Imagine eating until you are so full that food pops out of your rear. This sounds gross, but it serves a purpose for other insects. This juice that comes out with such force that it actually pops, leaves behind sweet drops of fluid that wasps, bees, flies and ants can feed on. An infestation of Candy Striped Leafhoppers could harm a plant, but normally a few feed on a plant and leave behind damaged leaves or stems. The population is kept under control by a few natural enemies, like birds and spiders, only if they are fast enough to catch this fast jumper.

They can have up to three generations in a mating season and actually puncture plant stems in order to lay their eggs, which hatch in about two to three weeks. They are born looking like a miniature adult, although they molt multiple times in a very short time frame in order to grow to full size within two weeks. Many leafhoppers only live for 30 days, so it takes multiple generations to continue their life cycle from year to year.

With the Candy Striped Leafhopper not being a Nashville Pest Control issue, you can find DIY gardener tips online to protect your flowers and berries if you find it necessary. However with the honeydew excretion they produce, it can draw actual pests, such as ants and wasps that can try and invade your home. If you happen to notice ant trails around and in your house, call Certified Pest Control Nashville to honestly and effectively address your issue. For locally owned and operated family service, give us a call for the personal and detailed Pest Control you deserve.

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Fire Beetle

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Fire Beetle

An Insect that seeks Forest Fires

Forest fires can run rampant, destroying thousands of acres along with homes and whole towns. Although humans consider this natural disaster a horrible thing to be avoided, there is an insect that thrives for this opportunity. When a forest fire begins to grow, the infrared heat that builds can travel many miles. We may be able to sense the urgency by site of fire and smoke, but humans do not have receptive enough sensory organs to feel that heat from miles away. However there is an insect that can not only feel the heat, but actually seeks it – the Fire Beetle.

As a forest fire begins to rage, many Fire Beetles begin to anticipate the opportunity they will have to reproduce. This beetle can sense the heat from a large fire up to 40 miles away. They are ultra sensitive due to the pit organs that it possesses in between its legs. These organs can detect infrared radiation that comes from a forest fire. However, unlike human’s tendency to run from a fire; these insects run towards the fire. Why would an insect ever have an attraction to such a large fire? They are seeking a safe place to reproduce, which begins the flying migration for the Fire Beetle.

The Fire Beetle can be Black or very colorful, almost mimicking the fire itself. They have a hard outer shell and measure about ½” in length. As they arrive and blend in with the carnage that has been left, they use their antennae to find a tree that is still smoldering. These antennae have been thought to act like smoke detectors that can sense this smolder from a mile away. Once the proper tree is identified, they begin to reproduce. This environment is conducive for the beetle’s reproduction for several reasons. The wood that has been left by the fire has been weakened, and therefore is very easy for the beetle to bore into for laying eggs. Also, since the whole area has been burned and destroyed of all life, it gives the beetle a safe place with no natural predators to eat their eggs. This dead tree is also a disease free source of food, making this a place for numerous wood boring beetles to mate safely. Even firefighters have to be aware of the numbers of beetles they may encounter in the still smoldering woods. Other than being a nuisance of getting into clothes, biting or pinching, they pose no serious danger. So the firefighters work around the cycle of life that happens with a forest fire.

The pit organs of the Fire Beetle are of interest to many scientist and researchers because of the sensitivity to presence of fire from many miles away.  Most all of human inventions to sense fire have to do with smoke or heat. However the Fire Beetle is far more advanced because it can detect infrared radiation. Humans cannot sense this type of a wave. If a sensor like the Fire Beetle possesses could be developed, it would assist with fighting fires. The major reason for this is because the infrared wavelength travels long distances. A sensor that could mimic the same type of sensitivity could alert officials that a very small fire has started miles away, and could be extinguished before it becomes a large problem to fight. The Fire Beetle could hold the answer to saving millions of dollars in fighting fires and the value of property damage that occur every year.

So, the Fire Beetle is not a Nashville Pest Control problem, rather it could become very helpful to those that live in areas prone to forest fires. However if you happen to find yourself with a beetle pest issue, such as Asian Lady Beetles, Carpet Beetles or Ground Beetles – please call your Local, Family Owned and Operated Certified Pest Control of Nashville.

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Odorous House Ant

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Odorous House Ant

Ant that Smells Like Coconut

The Odorous House Ant is a common Nashville Pest that can invade your home. They can be brown or black and will grow to an overall size of 1/8”. The odd thing about this species of ant is the odor they emit when crushed. The smell has been described as a licorice, coconut or a rotten odor. It is one of the most common house ants in the United States, so more than likely you have encountered this particular ant.

As the Odorous House Ant is looking for food, it is more than likely to satisfy their insatiable craving for sweets. In an outdoor environment they eat aphids and other small insects that contain honeydew. Their outdoor habitat is typically a colony under rocks, stacks of firewood, leaves, and around mulch surrounding dwellings. However they have a strong tendency to invade homes, due to the fact that we keep so many sweet sources of food in one place. Also, as with many insects, homes provide perfect harborage due to the fact that it is a warm place to nest, with plenty of access to food and moisture. Being a small insect, they seek out cracks, holes where pipes or duct enter the home from outside, and poor sealing door jams. Once inside they colonize and have nests inside walls, behind appliances, seldom used cabinets or even under door mats. With the Odorous House Ant now sharing your home they seek out the delicious sweets they desire. They will invade your pantry, crawl across floors and countertops looking for crumbs and take advantage of anything out in the open that is not in a sealed container. This emphasizes the importance of keeping plants and mulch from being placed right up against your home. Also make sure to regularly check for cracks and crevices that can assist with the ants from gaining entry. Lastly, good housekeeping and moisture elimination goes along ways with eliminating their food source.

This ant does not have a stinger, and is only left to bite in defense. They rarely bite, but instead rely on that same strange smell that they emit when crushed, to keep other predators away. If disturbed, they will run and spray this same odor from their rear. As they are crawling through your house, and over the sweets, they will also use this same odor trail to help orient and assist the colony workers to form regular trails to constant sources of food.

This ant’s population will grow quickly, if not kept in check with proper Pest Control Methods. They can live without water for a few months and are very adaptable to cold and hot weather. Typically they will live through winter as one colony, then as spring and summer have arrived, they will form multiple nests in order to more easily raid your home’s food sources. Each colony normally forms to number up to 2,000, however they have been observed to number into the tens of thousands with multiple queens. The ants you see will be workers, trailing through the house in order to bring back food and the sugar they desire, to feed the colony according to hierarchy. These ants are difficult to control; therefore a method of baiting in order to eliminate the colony must be implemented. Merely using a DIY spray to get rid of the ants you see will do no good.

So, if you have an ant problem in your home, choose to use a professional to properly eliminate the Pest Control Issue that so many have here in Nashville, TN. Leave it to our trained technicians at Certified Pest Control to identify and define the solution to this pesky house invader. Make it your choice to use a Local Nashville Pest Control specialist – Certified Pest Control – to provide a home town, honest approach to keeping your home pest free.  

 

 

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