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Weird Bugs

Bagworm Moth

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Bagworm Moth

Evergreen Enemy

I can remember picking “Bagworms” off of my mother’s evergreen trees as a child. No doubt, many of you also go about picking these off of your trees. But have you ever wondered what was inside those rough teardrop cases? It actually encases what will eventually become the Bagworm moth. So if you ever wondered how these bagworms became a part of the insect world, now you know that it is part of the metamorphosis of a beautiful black and white moth. However, until this happens, these bags not only are unsightly to look at they can also do damage to your trees that they inhabit.

The Bagworm Moth starts its life as a tiny egg that has been placed in evergreen trees. Those that have not been placed, can be spread by birds eating dead bagworms. The eggs are still fertile and are hard enough to pass through the bird’s digestive system and be spread far and wide. When they hatch into larvae that are tiny enough to float through the wind and find a nice tree to build their home. Their main preference is evergreens that live in Tennessee such as Cedar, Juniper, Spruce and Pine. This small larvae caterpillar constructs a bag from silk, leaves, bark and other local materials. They are a brownish / gray color here in Nashville and can be two to three inches long. They attach themselves to the host plant with silk that is strong enough that you will have to pull very hard or actually cut them off with small pruning shears or scissors. It is within this protective sack that they move, eat and grow. The female cannot fly and never leaves her bag, so the male matures into the Bagworm Moth and begins looking for a female to mate with. They mate through the bag; she lays her eggs and then dies. They will overcome trees and bushes with the appearance of these brown sacks hanging from many branches. If you see this, you may want to begin plucking; pulling and cutting them off, due to the fact that their voracious appetite can not only damage your evergreens, but can kill them if left to feed until full maturity. Other species have the female build the egg sack, then she lays up to 1,000 eggs inside the protective hanging bag to overwinter until the next spring, then she dies. They produce only one generation per year.  Either way the best thing to do is pick these evergreen killers off and dispose of them to keep your trees alive, full and healthy.

However, if you do not mind the damage of your evergreens, you can allow this caterpillar to grow and mature into a beautiful black and white spotted moth. They do not serve any beneficial purpose for us, other than allowing certain species of parasitic Wasp to survive and keep the Bagworm populations down.

The Bagworm Moth is not a Nashville Pest Control Issue, but the bags or sacks should be tended to. Since the female does not move, many times an infestation is kept to only one tree or bush. Keep an eye out and if you see any brown or gray upside down cones hanging from your evergreens, grab your scissors and begin removing. This will include the winter months, in order to keep the hatching caterpillars from damaging tour trees and bushes in the following spring.

So, you can take care of this issue yourself, but when you have Pest Control issues bugging your family, make Certified Pest Control in Nashville your first call. Our local family will take the time to address your pest problem and offer the detailed service that only a local family business can offer.

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Dung Beetle

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Dung Beetle

Born in a Ball of Manure

What are the rolled up balls of animal poop that you see here in Tennessee. Dung Beetles come in many different species, and we do have an active population of Dung Beetles right here in Nashville, Tennessee. Many have a misconception of these poop ball rollers only inhabiting faraway places such as Africa, due to the many nature shows that we have seen.  However there are Rollers, Tunnelers and Dwellers. Most of ours are rollers. The Beetles we see here use the balls of animal dung in order to reproduce. Yes, a horrible place to be born, but quite effective at serving its purpose.

Dung Beetles are very dark in color, and almost have a metallic appearance, have six legs and range in size from ¼” to over 1” in total length. The female Dung Beetle spends her time digging a tunnel for the upcoming delivery of her necessary dung ball. The male spends most of his time looking for animal scat or cow manure. So they exist in the woods on hiking trails and in our farm fields here in Tennessee. Once the scat has been located the Male will begin digging, clawing and forming this horrible mess into a ball. Once the ball is formed, he will complete the main responsibility of rolling the ball of dung to the tunnel that has been prepared by the female. She does tag along, I guess to make sure he does his job, but she will also help with the rolling at times. The Dung Beetle is very strong and can roll a ball of poop of up to 10 times their own body weight. And he does this in quite the awkward but necessary way to move this heavy ball; backwards. As they roll, it can continue into the night, with one species actually using the moonlight and stars to help them find their location. This is amazing that such a small beetle can navigate using the stars, like sailors of old. Once the dung ball has successfully been placed into the tunnel prepared by the female, she then lays her eggs in the middle of this stinky mess. This process gives the young something to eat once they hatch inside the tunnel. Even the adults return for this stinky snack from time to time. This composition of food also helps the beetles by providing moisture that the dung contains, making it a perfect source of food and water all in one.

The Dung Beetle is a very beneficial insect, as it cleans up animal scat and manure, buries it underground to provide fertilizer and helps spread the seeds consumed by animals to other areas. They also help reduce parasite larvae and disease carrying flies that feed on the cattle manure that can actually infect the herd.

So, if you happen to be walking through a cow pasture or even hiking our many Tennessee trails, be on the lookout for natures poop removal. You can spot them rolling away with their head to the ground and pushing with their hind legs, looking for their breeding tunnel. The Dung Beetle is not considered a Nashville Pest Control issue, but actually are quite welcome here for all of the benefits they provide. However if you are having pest control issues in our around your home call Certified Pest Control. We are your Nashville Local Family, providing superior service and affordable year round pest protection.

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Eastern Hercules Beetle

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Eastern Hercules Beetle

Horned Beetle that Grows to Seven Inches Long

What is that huge beetle in your yard that resembles a mini triceratops, and looks like some type of prehistoric insect? The Eastern Hercules Beetle, that lives right here in Nashville, Tennessee. This beetle is in fact one of the largest beetles to live in the United States. With a total body length of up to 7” (including horns) and close to 2” in width it can be quite a scary encounter when you see one. In addition to being so large they are equipped with two large horns protruding from their heads. Although they are such a large and scary looking insect, they are practically harmless to humans.

The Eastern Hercules Beetle actually takes care of decomposing stumps and wood in the forest. They are equipped with two pairs of wings and can fly, but are not adept at using these wings for anything other than clumsily flying from one place to another. They are so big and awkward that they are many times found on their backs just trying to get themselves back on their feet. Although there are many species of the Hercules Beetle, The Eastern Hercules Beetle that lives among us here in Nashville are gray or a yellowish tan with black spots. It is quite easy to tell the male from the female, as it is only the male that possesses horns. Their horns make up the majority of the massive overall length, and horns vary in size due to genetics and local food sources. These horns are primarily used in battle with other males when sparring over a potential mate, with the winner having the opportunity to fertilize the female. They lock horns and wrestle until one is flipped over and incapacitated. The female is able to lay up to 100 eggs and does not stick around to protect them. After twenty to thirty days these eggs hatch into larvae that also feeds upon decaying wood found in the stump that they were born in. They overwinter and develop into adults in about twelve months.

Many people catch and keep them as pets to observe there beauty and outrageous physical size and attributes. But this should be limited, due to deforestation and development taking their natural habitat. They are nocturnal and are attracted to light. Therefore many seek out the light at night, and then find themselves in harm’s way in the middle of a road. They are also delicious meals for other nocturnal meals such as raccoons and skunks.

Eastern Hercules Beetle’s are not to be feared, with the larvae eating rotten wood and the adults feeding on decomposing and rotten fruit that has fallen to the ground. They are rare to find, unless you are searching the woods or garden ground in the middle of the night. But if you do, don’t be surprised by this large prehistoric looking, yet harmless beetle. They don’t harm your garden, so let them be, clumsily bumbling around your garden looking for some delicious rotten fruit. The Eastern Hercules Beetle is not a Nashville Pest Control problem, but we do have many beetles that can become major pests in and around your home. If your home has any unwanted invaders, please contact our local family owned and operated service provider – Certified Pest Control. Contact us to learn more about our affordable year long pest control protection plan.

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Canadian Owlet Moth

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Canadian Owlet Moth

Camouflage of a Dried up Dead Leaf

The Canadian Owlet Moth is a rather undetected moth here in Tennessee. The reason is that they are so adept at camouflage, appearing to be a dried up dead leaf. They are more numerous in the Northern parts of the United States, as the name suggests, but we do have them as natural inhabitants of Nashville, Tennessee. If you have sharp eyesight and know the shape that you are looking for, you might just spot one in your back yard. They are brown in color and have a V like shape when in the resting position with wings up. They have a wingspan of up to 1 ½” and body length ranging from ¾” to 1 ½”. They do inhabit most of the United States and Canada except for the most Western portions of both countries.

The Canadian Owlet Moth carries another trait that makes them hard to spot; they are nocturnal. Therfore you now know where the name is derived from. Most species only produce one generation per year, so you will see them out looking for a mate, or foraging for food. They mate once, then have an overwintering generation for the next spring. Their diet consists mainly of live or dead foliage, nectar and honeydew.  Some species have been known to harm crops by piercing into fruit to eat and thus damaging the gardener’s hard work. The species with the most fear inspiring reputation lives in Malaysia. It is known to feed like a bat, by biting into the skin of animals and being a blood sucker. Though this species is indeed real, but we do not have that worry with our relatively harmless species of Canadian Owlet Moth living here in Tennessee.

Bats are natural predators of the Owlet Moth since they are both nocturnal. However the Owlet Moth has tympanal organs that can pick up the sonar produced by a bat looking for food. So they can run and hide when they hear a bat on the prowl. However it is their other forms of defense that is most interesting. Although they hide with camouflage, they also carry three forms of chemical warfare as protection. They use an Alkaloid, a Formic Acid and then a chemical that they use as perimeter control. Yes this perimeter control is not only gross but effective. It is distributed around their area by actually vomiting up chemicals found in the plants that they feed on.  This repels other predators from getting too close and producing a threat.

In other countries the Canadian Owlet Moth and other related species are major garden and crop pests. However here in Tennessee, we do not have much of a problem, other than looking for telltale signs of them with broken stems at the base. They never really reach infestation levels in our gardens, so they are really another interesting insect to try and spot locally here in Nashville, Tennessee. Now, if you do have a Nashville Pest Control Problem, please call your local born and raised Nashville Family – Certified Pest Control Nashville. We offer the detailed and honest service you would expect from a locally owned and operated pest prevention service. Call and ask about our year round protection plan. We would love to explain how affordable it is to keep those pesky home invaders where they belong – outside.

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Broad-Headed Sharpshooter

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Broad-Headed Sharpshooter

Speed like a Bullet

With a wide head and bulky body, the Broad-headed Sharpshooter does not seem to be a prospect for high speeds. However this insect shoots like a bullet when it is time to attack. Their many different bright colors are somewhat understated compared to others in it’s family, such as the Candy Striped Leaf Hopper. However having a similar appearance to a leaf can fool some predators. So they rely on speed as their main line of attack and defense.

While many insects rely on camouflage and using every method possible to blend in with their natural surroundings in order to survive, the Broad-Headed Sharpshooter has to rely on other methods to survive. Other than being one of the quickest insects, with bullet like speed and being able to jump an equivalent of 240’ in comparison to humans, they have another line of distraction. If the Broad-headed Sharpshooter feels threatened they will shoot out a stream of waste on their predators to cover, confuse and distract them as the Sharpshooter makes its speedy get away.

They a ravenous eaters and use their sponge like mouth parts to suck juices out of plants. These juices are what help them produce their yucky stream of defense juices on predators. They also eat so much that they gorge themselves to the point of literally popping out the excrement from their bodies. Yes, it actually makes a popping noise when it exits. This excrement leaves behind food for other insects to feed on, such as ants, aphids and wasps. Even though they can eat large amounts, they usually spare plants, other than leaving the telltale signs with damaged leaves and stems. The population is kept under control by a few natural enemies, like birds and spiders, only if they are fast enough to catch this fast as a bullet insect.

They can have up to three generations in a mating season and actually puncture plant stems in order to lay their eggs, which hatch in about two to three weeks. They are born looking like a small adult, although they molt multiple times in a very short time frame in order to grow to full size within two weeks. Many Sharpshooters only live for 30 days, so it takes multiple generations to continue their life cycle from year to year.

With the Broad-headed Sharpshooter not being a Nashville Pest Control issue, you can find tips online to protect your gardens. Specifically if you happen to have peaches, as they are known to carry a bacteria that can harm peach trees.  So, keep on the watch, as they are hard to observe. If they see you approaching, expect it to shoot away like a bullet. You also want to keep watch on the aphids, ants and wasps that they attract through their excrement. Gardeners in particular want to keep close watch on signs of the Sharpshooter due to the other destructive insects they attract. If you happen to notice ant trails around your house or unwanted wasps, call Certified Pest Control Nashville to honestly and effectively address your issue. For locally owned and operated family service, give us a call for the personal and detailed Pest Control you deserve.

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Formica Ant

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Formica Ant

Ant Head Hunter

Formica Ants are part of an ant species that include wood ants, mound ants and field ants. They are medium sized ants at ¼” in average length. This ant might not be the largest in the ant world but certain species can be quite vicious within their insect habitat. They shoot acid at other ants, rip them apart and collect their skulls. Other species raid and make indentured servants of other ants and some species actually herd aphids to create their food source. This rabid, yet crafty ant does inhabit Nashville, Tennessee and can be a pest control issue, with the death of the queen being the only way to get rid of the colony.

Formica Ants are often misidentified as carpenter ants. They are similar in size but the Formica has two humps in it’s thorax making a bump where it connects to the abdomen, where the Carpenter Ant only has one evenly shaped thorax. They are black, brown and red in appearance as is the carpenter ant, but the Formica Ant generally is smaller. They both share some of the same food sources; however Carpenter Ants cause damage to many homes by burrowing into the structural wood in order to make their nest. The Formica Ant is primarily an outside ant and makes their nests in mounds near trees or logs, but can also nest against your home. It is outside your home that they feed on their favorite food source: aphid honeydew. So, Formica Ants have developed the ability to track down aphids and herd them to keep them close and doing the hard work. By keeping them in a group, the aphids will feed on the surrounding plants, and then excrete the honeydew as a byproduct. The Formica Ant only has to eat this byproduct without doing any hard work, just keep the aphids in formation, follow them and eat their excretion.

Some Formica Ant species take over other ant colonies and enslave them to work and to help raise their young. As the queen kills the other adults, then she is left with the pupae to be born to what they think is their mother. Ants learn from this early stage what they are. Knowing only one mother, they become her slaves as she then lays her own eggs and these poor misled young ants actually take care of her eggs. Once the queen eggs hatch, they then begin one big army, thinking they are one family. It has been observed that these new armies will often then go and raid other nests, kill the adults and bring back the pupae to serve as even more enslaved ants of different species.

The most gruesome characteristic of some Formica Ants species is the killing of other ants and covering their mounds with their decapitated heads. These ants are able to shoot formic acid as a defense or for killing other prey. This acid is used to kill other ants; they then eat the ant and for some reason cover their mound nest with ant heads. Imagine a head hunter village of ants, where other ants are scared to tread. It is unknown why they engage in this activity, but it sure is strange.

While Formica Ants are not usually a Nashville Pest Control issue, they can be if they choose to build against your home. If you notice ant mounds, or are having other ant pest issues in or around your home make sure to give us a call at Certified Pest Control Nashville. Ants can be a difficult issue to solve, since they can travel long distances from their nest and into your home. So allow us to properly track and diagnose the best method to rid your home of an ant invasion. Our local family is happy to give you a free estimate and properly address your pest control issue. Choose our local family owned and operated business that cares about our quality of work and creating happy customers. Certified Pest Control Nashville should be your first choice to protect your home with year round pest preventative protection.

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Beetle That Spends Most of it's Life Unseen

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Beetle That Spends Most of it's Life Unseen

Cottonwood Borer Beetle

In Tennessee we have native Poplar trees, Cottonwood trees and Willows. This makes us a perfect host for the Cottonwood Borer Beetle. This beetle is a member of the longhorned beetle family and can be quite large, being up to 1 ¾” Long and ½” wide with antennae that can be longer than their entire body. They are actually one of our largest beetles in the United States, and can be quite intimidating in appearance, especially with their antennae that resemble long horns and make them look even bigger. They have a very distinctive Black and cream color pattern which cover their body and wings. They are not much harm to us, but can be to certain tree species in Tennessee.

The Cottonwood Borer Beetle starts its life in late summer to early fall, as they emerge as adults, where their eggs were placed at the base of a tree. This process takes up to two years, as the female lays the eggs, and actually bites into the bark at the base of the tree where the egg is placed. When the egg develops into the larvae state, the larvae then can do the bulk of the damage of host trees by entering this starting point bitten out by their mother. They will dig into the root of a tree as they feed. If the tree happens to be young, the damage done by the feeding larvae can completely kill the new tree. With larger trees they tend to bore into the tree about one inch deep and begin to form tunnels. During the 2nd winter the larvae is much larger and will travel these tunnels to do even more damage, but most large adult trees can survive this young Cottonwood Borer Beetle as it eats and grows. Once it is time to emerge as an adult in late summer, they eat and mate over a short lifespan of only one month. In this short time as an adult Cottonwood Borer Beetle, they also do their fair share of damage by eating soft bark, new growth on trees and their leaves. They feed on our Cottonwood trees, Poplar trees and Willows; however the good news is that they prefer to choose sick or dying trees as their host for growth. So, it is the young new trees and the dying trees that are at most risk.

The Cottonwood Borer Beetle does not really have much of a defense system, nor does it need one. They only live one month as an adult, and the two years that they live and grow through the larvae and pupal stages are inside small tunnels in the tree. Woodpeckers, parasites and long periods of flooding are the biggest threat to the Cottonwood Borer Beetle.

The Cottonwood Borer Beetle is not considered a Nashville Pest Control issue. They do invade our Tennessee State Tree, but as stated, they primarily prey on the sick and dying trees. They also are not an insect that becomes infestations, thus the numbers really never become uncontrollable like many others fast producing pests. Your best line of defense for your Poplars and Willows is to keep your trees healthy and avoid nicking them near the base with your lawnmower and string trimmer. Other than that, it’s hard to fight a pest you can’t see. However if you do see pests around your home that need a Pest Control Pro, call your Local Pest Control Family – Certified Pest Control Nashville.

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Robber Fly

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Robber Fly

Flying Insect Predator

The Robber Fly is here in Tennessee, you just have a hard time spotting them. If you do happen to see one, it would probably be hiding in a heavily covered area of plants or in the soil. They only come out during the hottest hours of a sunny day to hunt. And when they are out they are mostly in flight or hiding in a strike pose ready to capture their prey. The Robber Fly is a true predator and only feeds on other insects and their larvae. And as stated, they spend a lot of time flying, so they catch most of their prey in the air. They are so adept at air attacks and voracious predators that they even attack and kill large Bumble Bees.

Robber Flies are fairly large themselves, being up to 1 ¾” Long and ½” in diameter. They are distinctive looking with large bristles on their head that make it look as if they have a moustache. These flies are long and skinny and range from a dark gray or black in color and look very hairy with bristles covering most of their bodies. They have two large compound eyes with a large indentation between them. The Robber Fly is quite intimidating looking, so they match their aggressive predatory behavior.

The Robber Fly quickly soars through fields looking to swoop in like a hawk on any flying insect. They are not very particular in diet as they will kill and eat Bumble Bees, Moths, Ants, Wasps, Crickets, Butterflies, Dragonflies and Honey Bees. They will literally eat any insect that flies. Some will hide out near a hive and just wait to pick off single bees as they are coming and going from their home. They will attack, hold its prey with their legs and bite them thus injecting their venom. This venom kills the prey and also helps turn it into a more liquid state for the Robber Fly to suck up and eat the insect leaving a hollow shell. Although they are natural born killers, they also have their fair share of predators including birds, praying mantis, spiders and assassin bugs. Another reason that we rarely see them, is that they all have their territory, so you will usually only see one if you get that rare chance. If an adult Robber Fly invades the territory another Robber Fly, they are likely to become a cannibalistic meal.

Robber Flies are not like normal flies with very short life spans; rather they can live up to 3 months. During these 3 months, they eat and mate. The female will lay her eggs on vegetation or in the soil, have five stages of development and the eggs overwinter to continue the long growth process. The eggs while in the larvae stage move around to feed on eggs of other insects much like they do as adults, sucking the insides out. The process from egg to adult can take from one to three years.

We are relatively safe from this ruthless killer, as Robber Flies do not have stingers. They can bite if threatened which will be quite painful, but is not harmful in general. Either way do not attempt to handle a Robber Fly unless you want to risk a bite. The Robber Fly is not a Nashville Pest Control issue; rather they can help control the populations of other flying insects including the common house fly around your home. However if you are experiencing an uninvited pest at your home make sure to call Certified Pest Control Nashville. We can provide year round pest control and deliver local family service without pesky commissioned sales people. We at Certified Pest Control are just family, and would love to become part of your family.

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Fishing Spider

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Fishing Spider

Spider that can walk on water and catch fish

When you think of Spiders, rarely do you ever think of them as running on water or catching fish as prey. That does not sound like anything that could exist in the insect world. However the Fishing Spider or “Dolomedes” does actually hunt for fish as a food source.  This larger spider species can reach over 1” in length and are brow or gray in color to blend in with the forest floors around water sources and are resident spiders here in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Fishing Spider does feed on other insects, just like related spiders. They will strategically place themselves at the edge of a source of water with one set of legs anchoring their body to the shore and the front legs extended out and floating on top of the water. The Fishing Spider is similar to an orb weaver, that senses vibrations on their “trap” web with their sensitive legs then goes in for the kill; except this spider senses the vibrations in the water. Their whole bodies are covered in very small and very sensitive hairs that can give them feedback from the water. When an insect or fish is nearby, these hairs designed with a high degree of feedback can tell the spider where their prey is and even give it an idea of what direction the water vibration is coming from. So, if the prey does not come to them as they are anchored to the shore, they can go in pursuit. This is because the hairs are also water repellent giving the Fishing Spider the ability to walk, run or swim on top of the water. They quickly get to the prey, such as a May Fly and attack. Being slick and buoyant, they can even raise up their front legs to catch the wind and sail across the water. However the Fishing Spider has another trick up its sleeve with the ability to actually go under water to catch prey. With the wax or oil like covering on the hairs on their bodies, they can actually form air bubbles that allow them to go under water and hunt for short amounts of time. This makes them very adept hunters, on top of and under the water, with tiny claws on the ends of their front legs to locate, secure the prey and then inject venom. This has led them to be observed actually hunting and eating very small fish. As crazy as this may seem, this spider hunts and eats fish due to their highly advanced body structure and special hairs they possess. These hairs are so sensitive, they can even keep the spider from gathering information that would prove to be a false positive, such as a leaf hitting the water or excessive currents in the water. They are specifically designed to sense the vibrations of a struggling insect on top of the water, or fish / tadpoles just below the surface of the water.

The Fishing Spider mates and then the eggs actually carried by the female until they hatch. With other spider species, the male actually is killed by the female after mating, however with the Fishing Spider the male actually dies without any attack from the female, as if he is giving his life to the female to eat. The female then guards the young of up to 1,000 as they grow in a protected small web sac.

These seemingly aggressive hunters are no threat to humans, as they rarely bite and even if they do it is like a minor bee sting. If you see one near your home, it may seem alarming as they resemble a very large Wolf Spider, but they are not normally considered a Nashville Pest Control Issue. However if you notice other pests such as Brown Recluse or Black Widows lurking, be quick to call Certified Pest Control Nashville, Tennessee to help diagnose and define your pest prevention program. Our Family owned and operated business will offer the best service and rates in Nashville. Just give us a try, you will not be disappointed.

 

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Blue Mud Dauber

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Blue Mud Dauber

Wasp that Hunts Spiders

Most people do not like to see wasps around their house due to the nasty sting they can deliver. However the Blue Mud Dauber that we have here in Nashville, Tennessee could be a welcome site. They help control the spider population around your home.

This impressive looking wasp is a beautiful blue metallic in appearance, are about ½” long with a narrow waist and wings that match their blue bodies. They live a more docile life than most wasps that you fear stinging you, in that they only sting if threatened to the point of being killed. That is because they are solitary wasps, rather living in a colony. They can’t afford to sting you and then die, because then there would not be any other wasp to protect their nest. The Blue Mud Dauber spends most of its day flying around and eating nectar and pollen. So, with a diet of nectar, how does this wasp help control the spider population around your house? It is the egg laying process that causes the Blue Mud Dauber to search for and paralyze spiders. It seems as if they prefer Black Widow Spiders, which is good news to us. Once the Blue Mud Dauber has mated it then seeks out an abandoned mud nest from another mud dauber to call home to a single egg. This is where the spiders come into the picture. This wasp will hunt spiders, sting them with venom that paralyzes them and bring them back to the nest. Once laying its egg, the Blue Mud Dauber then packs the mud tube full of spiders and seals it off for protection. Instead of killing the spiders this mud dauber is smart enough to only paralyze them so that they will not decompose fast, but rather stay alive in a state of paralysis so that they will stay fresh as long as possible. As the egg matures and hatched into a larva it then has a ready source of food to eat. The larva will overwinter in the sealed off tube, safe from any predators and plenty of spider food. As spring develops, the larva will continue to eat the spiders until it has eaten its way out of the nest as a Blue Mud Dauber adult. Then the whole process begins again; so goes the circle of life and more spider control.

Although the Blue Mud Dauber does assist with your Spider Pest Control, they do live in the unsightly mud tubes that you will find clinging to your house. So, it becomes the lesser of two evils; ugly mud tubes, but less spiders. However, if you happen to have an abundance of wasp issues around your home, or not enough Blue Mud Daubers to assist with a spider issue – call your local Nashville Pest Control specialist at Certified Pest Control. Our local family owned and operated company is happy to give you a free quotation, offer great and honest service and always just a phone call away for any issue you may have. Consider asking about our affordable yearlong pest prevention program; you will not be disappointed.

 

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